Category: Food Blog & Review

Biko From Alma’s Kitchen

Biko, photo by PH Morton

Biko From Alma’s Kitchen

My sister-in-law, Alma is a very capable woman.  A good example of a decent human being.  She is friendly, she is caring, she can’t do enough to be helpful to anyone.

She is well like by everyone.

Her abilities go on and on.  What I like most about her is her cooking.  She can really cook up a storm.

Her biko is to die for.  Peter, my English hubby, who do not usually eat anything made of rice love’s Alma’s biko.

The above photo was from Alma’s kitchen.  Doesn’t it look so delicious?  And it was so yummy.

Click here for the recipe!

Biko a a favourite of mine.  It reminds me of happy childhood and young adulthood in the Philippines. It reminds me of my loving family, cheerful, always ready for a laugh and adventure.

I remember my mother going to market and coming home with biko, which we would share and enjoy.

I remember my grandfather coming home with ‘pasalubong’ of biko, amongst others, when he goes out.

Biko is a symbol of halcyon days for me!

Sinangag (Garlic Fried Rice Filipino Style)

Sinangag, Photo by JMorton

Sinangag Breakfast , Photo by JMorton

Sinangag (Garlic Fried Rice Filipino Style)

Filipino fried rice called sinangag is the easiest fried rice recipe to do.

It is so tasty because of the addition of fragrant garlic.  It gets even tastier if the oil you fry it in was from the oil you fried your meat of dried fish in as it absorbed all the tasty residue of the meat or fish.

Fried rice are better cooked from left-over rice or at least rice that has been cooked a day or night before.  A day old rice has a a better texture as it had ‘dried’ up as it sits on the fridge.  A fried rice from a freshly boiled rice tend to yield a rather soggy mess.

Sinangag cannot be simpler.  It can just be from left-over rice, onion and garlic.  This is because it is often eaten with separately cooked friend eggs, salted eggs, hot-dog sausages or the best there is – tuyo or danggit.  (See above photo.)  All washed down with a hot strong milky coffee.

Ingredients:

2 cups leftover rice, even out the clumps

4-6 garlic, peeled and chopped or minced finely

1/2 onion, chopped finely

salt & pepper to taste

1 tbsp cooking oil

Procedure:

Heat the oil using a wok or a large frying pan over medium to high heat.

Fry the garlic, then quickly add the onion.  Stir-fry until fragrant.

Add the rice.  Fry vigorously until the grains absorbed all the oil giving off a fragrant breakfasty aroma. 🙂

Serve immediately with any of your favourite meaty or fishy breakfast.

Enjoy!

 

34452 Mask – Clicks Global Research

43352 Mask, photo by JMorton

34452 Mask – Clicks Global Research

Ok, I have joined Clicks Global Research with the intention of getting products to review on my website.

This 34452 Mask is the very first product that I have received.  I got it just now 9 September 2017.

I have to start it immediately as I have to complete questionnaire no 1.

I hope this mask will make my ageing skin brighter!

….

Day 1

I have just applied the mask at 12:21pm after I have cleanse my face thoroughly with Simple foaming cleanser followed by Nivea gentle Exfoliating scrub.

I applied the mask generously as now I am beginning to feel a little tightening to my face and a little itching between my nose and lips.

It is 12:31, I rinsed off the mask with warm water.  I don’t see much difference, except I feel refreshed and I can still feel a nice tingling to my face.  Nice.

Day 2

Noticed that my face was itchy and had a two or three pimples overnight but surprisingly my skin is brighter.

Apply another coat of the mask.

Yeah, my face is brighter and thank goodness, the pimples did not bother to stay.  They just vanished as quickly as they appeared.

Hotdogs – Philippines Favourite Sausage

Hotdogs, photo by Arnold Gamboa

Hotdogs – Philippines Favourite Sausage

I have to say of all sausages, I love the Philippine hotdog of all. I love its bright matt red colour as it promises a sure succulent delight, extra juicy, especially smothered in tangy spicy banana ketchup.

I have tasted a lot of sausages.  British supermarkets stock quite a variety from around the world.  There are the Brits’ very own Cumberland, Gloucester, Lincolnshire, Pork & Leek, Pork and apple, black pudding,etc.  There are other Europeans ones such as chipolatas, chorizo, saveloy, Vienna sausage, Toulouse, Lyon, Bierwurst, salami, kabanos, just to mention a few.

If you happen to go to the Philippines and find street food vender, why not dry a freshly grilled or lightly fried hotdog.  They are delicious!

 

Salted Caramel Milkshake Recipe

Salted Caramel Milk Shake, Photo by JMorton

Salted Caramel Milkshake Recipe

I had a salted caramel milkshake when we last went to Gourmet Burgers in Brent Cross.  I absolutely loved it.  The slight saltiness greatly compliment the sweetness of the caramel.  It was really refreshing.

I wanted to make it at home and found a very easy recipe to follow which I have posted below.

Enjoy, kindly let me know how yours went! 🙂

Ingredients:

  • 300 ml cold milk
  • 1 ½ tsp caramel sauce
  • sprinkling of sea salt

Directions

Tip the ice cream, milk, caramel sauce with a little sprinkling of sea salt into a food processor.  Blend until smooth and frothy.

Pour into tall glasses and share.

Max’s Fried Chicken Recipe

Max’s Signature Chicken, photo by JMorton

Max’s Fried Chicken Recipe

During a recent holiday in the Philippines, we visited Max’s Restaurant a lot as we were staying in a hotel nearby.

I have to say, Max’s fried chicken is really something.  It is soft and moist in the inside and it is crispy at the outside.  Simply tasty.  If you happened to go to the Philippines, be sure to try one of Max’s chicken. 🙂

I thought since we eat a lot of chicken in the UK, how can I make it taste like Max’s?!!!

So I trawled the internet and this is the recipe that I got.

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium size whole corn-fed or organic chicken
  • 4  dried bay leaves
  • 2 heaped tablespoons chopped parsley
  • 1 large onion, peeled and quartered
  • 2 cloves, garlic, minced finely
  • 5 cups water
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • oil
Instructions
  1. Use a large steamer; if the steamer is not large enough to contain the whole chicken then cut the chicken in half.
  2. Add the water to the steamer and bring to a boil.
  3. Drop in the bay leaves and chopped parsley into the boiling water
  4. Arrange the chicken into the steamer and cook for 50 minutes.
  5. Take out the chicken from the steamer to let any excess liquid drip out.  Set it aside for half an hour.
  6. Rub minced garlic, salt and pepper all over the chicken and the inside cavities.
  7. In a deep-fryer or large casserole pan, heat the cooking oil.
  8. Deep-fry the chicken.  If the oil does not cover the whole chicken, carefully turn the chicken round until it is golden all over.
  9. Remove the chicken and let it drip and cool down a little.
  10. Serve hot with gravy or choice of sauces.

 

Congee With Dried Anchovies

Congee with Dried Anchovies, photo by PH Morton

Congee With Dried Anchovies

When we stayed at the Armada Hotel, in Malate, Philippines for almost a whole week, everyday, I started by breakfast with congee or lugaw topped with crispily fried dried anchovies or dilis.

It was strange at first as I have never had dili in my lugaw before but I quickly developed a taste for it.  It sets the day right.

Now back in London, I am missing this little treat.  Thank goodness it is pretty easy to make at home.

Here is the recipe –

Ingredients:

Congee
  1. 3 tsp sesame oil
  2. 1 small onion, chopped finely
  3. 1/2 cup long-grain rice (uncooked)
  4. 4 cups vegetable stock or 3 vegetable cubes dissolved in 4 cups of hot water
  5. 1/2 ” piece of ginger (grated finely)
Toppings
  1. 2 tbsp chili oil
  2. 2 tbsp dried anchovies, fried until golden and crispy
  3. 1 egg (boiled)
  4. 6 cloves garlic, chopped finely and then fried until golden brown
  5. 1 stalk spring onion, chopped
  6. Fish sauce
  7. Calamansi or lemon, juiced

Preparation:

Congee

  1. Heat the sesame oil in a large saucepan over high heat.
  2. Add the chopped onion and fry until translucent.
  3. Stir in the rice and cook for a couple of minutes until well covered with the oil.
  4. Pour in vegetable stock, add the ginger and bring to a boil.
  5. When it starts to boil, reduce the heat and leave to simmer but ensure to give it a stir once in a while.
  6. When the rice had softened and absorbed most of the liquid and has a porridge-like thickness, then it is cooked but if a more runny consistency is wished, add more hot water.

Toppings

  1. Fry the anchovies in wok or frying pan with a little oil.  Stir for 5 minutes until golden brown and crispy all over.
  2. Ladle a good portion for one in a bowl. Add a bit of fish sauce to the congee.  Sprinkle with the fried garlic and chopped spring onion then add the chopped boiled egg and dried anchovies.
  3. Finally drizzle with the juice of calamansi or lemon according to taste.

Enjoy!

Max Restaurant Vs Aristocrat Restaurant

Max Restaurant Vs Aristocrat Restaurant

Before we left the Philippines we held von voyage parties and treated our family to a couple of dinners.

Prior to Marilou’s departure for Los Angeles, on 7th July, we went to Max Restaurant in Malate.  We thoroughly enjoyed the meal, the service was good and the venue was family-friendly.

The food was so good.  We had sinigang na hipon (there were lots of shrimps on the two pots provided, Max’ signature dish of fried chicken was delicious.  It was soft and moist in the inside and crispy at the outside.

The kare-kare was to die for.  It was so delicious in itself, the bagoong that went with it was almost redundant.

The fried pork bellies were so  crunchy and good portion.

The fried bangus came with the most sour vinegar I have ever tasted that it send me coughing for a little bit.  It was delicious though.

The glasses of pineapple juices were very much appreciated.

For afters we had a very cooling, very colourful buko pandan.

The amount of the food was too much for the nine of us that we had to have doggie bags for some of the leftovers.

Anyway fun and full stomachs were had by all.

On the eve of our own departure for London on the 12, we decided to bring the family we were living behind in the Philippines to Aristocrats Restaurant, also in Malate an adjacent to Max Restaurant.

I was feeling unwell then so I was unable to go.  Instead Peter went with the Family.

After the meal they came to the hotel full of negative comments about Aristocrats.

They said it was so different from Max.

The service was atrocious.  They had to remind the restaurant staff about their orders a few times.  The food was okay to be fair but nothing special.

I think Aristocrat has become a victim of its own success.  Once upon a time, it used to be the haunt of the moneyed class.

But due to Filipinos having more disposable income, there are more customers and potential customer wanting a bit of the Aristocrat’s reputation of long ago.  Unfortunately the staff can’t cope with the increase demand, thus the service is  now rudimentary.  The waiting staff appear rather indifferent.

Peter was so annoyed that he wished now that he did not leave any trip, as the waiters did not deserve any. 🙂 🙂 🙂

So if I have to choose which restaurant to go to?  I would definitely go for Max!

%d bloggers like this: