Category: FOOD & DRINKS

Chicken & Vegetable Broth Recipe

Chicken & Veg Broth, photo by PH Morton

 

Chicken & Vegetable Broth Recipe

October might be autumn in the UK but there is already a touch of the wintry weather especially at night.  We even have had to turn on the gas central heating to take out the the chill in the house.

Last night, it was fairly chilly again and thank goodness, we have the ingredients to make a chicken and vegetable broth for an easy supper.  A liberal sprinkling of freshly ground black pepper (as seen of the photo above) added heat to a delicious soup.

 

Ingredients

  • 2oz butter
  • 2 onions, peeled and sliced
  • 2 sticks celery, finely chopped
  • 100g kale, chopped
  • 2 carrots, peeled, finely chopped
  • 2oz plain flour
  • 2 pints chicken stock
  • 1lb cooked chicken, skinned and shredded
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method of Preparation:

  1. Melt the butter in a large saucepan over a medium heat and gently fry the onions, celery and carrots until they start to soften.  Then mix in the kale.

  2. Stir in the flour and cook for 2 minutes. Add the chicken stock and bring the mixture to the boil, stirring as you do so. Season with salt and pepper, then reduce the heat until the mixture is simmering and simmer for 10 minutes, until the vegetables are tender.

  3. Add the cooked chicken and cook until heated through. Adjust the seasoning, stir in the parsley and serve.

  4. Sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper 🙂

Mango & Sultana Jelly

Mango,

Mango & Sultana Jelly

This is a refreshingly delicious dessert that would delight even the most fastidious eater.

If you can find a ripe carabao mango, please do so.  It is apparently the sweetest fruit ever.

Anyway this recipe is called mangga gulaman in the Philippines and the recipe has been tried and tested and of course tasted a million times.  🙂

 

Ingredients

• 1 large mango, peeled and chopped in small pieces but not too finely

1 heaped tablespoon sultanas or raisin

1 packet plain jelly

Water

2 tbsp sugar

 

Preparation:

  • Pour boiling water into a measuring jug; the amount of water should correspond with the jelly packet’s instruction.
  • Pull apart the jelly and place on a mould or an heatproof serving dish.
  • Pour the measured boiled water over the jelly. Add the sugar.   Mix until everything has dissolved.
  • Leave to cool a little then add the mango and raisin.
  • Leave covered to cool completely and then refrigerate until set.

Minted Mashed Potatoes

Potatoes
by Jean Morton

Mashed potatoes is a popular English potato recipe.  It is very versatile at it goes with so many cooked recipes such as fried meat & fish, sausages and stew.  It is also easy to make and yield delicious creamy potato dish.

Minted Mashed Potatoes

  • Using a large pan, boil the potatoes in salted water for 20-30 minutes or until potatoes have softened.
  • Drain using a colander.
  • Return the potatoes into the pan and mash with a masher 🙂 or a fork while still hot.
  • Pour in the olive oil and stir in the butter or margarine with the mint sauce.  Mix well until properly incorporated.
  • Add the nutmeg and season with salt.
  • Scatter the chopped mint leaves on top.

Serve with grilled meat, fish, stew or sausages.

 

 Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs white potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 2 oz softened butter or margarine
  • 1½ tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tsp mint sauce
  • small pinch of nutmeg
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh mint
  • salt & pepper

 

Rosehip Syrup

Rose hips

I noticed the abundance of rosehip from my garden and I got to thinking if I could do something with them. My husband suggested a rosehip syrup that he remembers fondly from his childhood. The syrup was sweet-tasting and bursting with goodness of Vitamin C, just the drink, hot or cold, during the autumn season.

Anyway here is a recipe from Hugh Feanley-Whittingstall

Rosehip syrup

 

Rosehip syrup is dripping with vitamin C and has long had a reputation for keeping colds at bay all winter. Far from being austere, though, it has a surprisingly tropical tang, with notes of lychee and mango. Diluted with about five parts cold water, it makes a delicious cordial drink, which kids will love, and a fantastic autumn cocktail for grown-ups. It’s also an indulgent alternative to maple syrup on ice cream, waffles and pancakes.

 

  • You will also need a jelly bag (or a clean cotton cloth and a big sieve)
  • Put two litres of water in a large pan and bring to the boil. Throw in the chopped rosehips, bring back to the boil, then remove from the heat, cover and leave to infuse for half an hour, stirring from time to time.
  • Strain the mixture through a jelly bag. (Alternatively, line a colander with a couple of layers of muslin and place over a large bowl. Tip in the rosehip mixture, and leave suspended over the bowl.)
  • Set the strained juice aside and transfer the rosehip pulp back to the saucepan, along with another litre of boiling water. Bring to the boil, remove from the heat, infuse for another half an hour and strain as before. Discard the pulp and combine the two lots of strained juice in a clean pan. Bring to the boil, and boil until the volume has decreased by half. Remove from the heat.
  • Add the sugar and stir until dissolved. Return to the stove, bring to the boil and boil hard for five minutes. Pour into warmed, sterilised jars or bottles and seal.

 

Ingredients:

  • 1kg rosehips, washed and chopped
  • 1kg caster sugar

Soda Bread Recipe

Soda Bread, Photo by Jmorton

Soda Bread, Photo by JMorton

Soda Bread Recipe

 

Soda Bread is an Irish bread.  Delicious smothered in real butter.  Perfect accompaniment for meat stews to soak up all the lovely gravy off your plate.  Yum.

The recipe below is adapted by a Tesco recipe.

Soda Bread Recipe

Ingredients

  • 500g plain flour, plus extra to dust
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 25g (1oz) butter
  • 1 tbsp caster sugar
  • 284ml pot buttermilk

Method of Preparation:

  • Preheat the oven to Gas Mark 6/200°C/Fan 180°C.
  • Tip the flours, baking soda and salt into a large bowl. Then use your fingertips to rub the butter into the flour until evenly dispersed.
  • Stir in the sugar.
  • Make a well in the centre of the flour and stir in the buttermilk until you get a soft dough.
  • Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and lightly knead for 1 min until smooth, then bring together to form a flattened round about 5cm thick and 15cm across.
  • Place on a lightly dusted baking sheet. Dust with a little plain flour if you like. Use a large sharp knife to cut 2 slashes across the bread to make an ‘x’. Bake in the oven for 35 – 40mins until well-risen and browned. Place on a wire rack and leave to cool.

Pork Stewed in Tomato Sauce


Pork Stewed in Tomato Sauce

This is a delicious family.  It is very filling and perfect served with freshly boiled rice or steamed new potatoes or even mashed potatoes.

Ingredients

400g pork shoulder, cut into fairly large pieces about 1½ inches chunks
3 tbsp. Extra virgin Olive oil
8 sprigs thyme, hard stalks trimmed, chopped
3 cloves garlic, crushed
1 medium size onion, finely chopped
2-3 bay leaves
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. ground black pepper
1/2 tsp. paprika
1/4 tsp. saffron
170ml. red wine (cheap plonk) 🙂 decent one for drinking 🙂
1 1/2 tbsp. red wine vinegar
400g fresh chopped tomatoes or 1 can of chopped plum tomatoes
1 medium size green or yellow marrow sliced
150g. flat green beans, topped and tailed and cut into 2 inches lengths

How to make:

  1.  Pre-heat the oven to  gas mark 180ºC.
  2. Using a casserole pan, heat the olive oil  over medium heat.
  3. Once the oil is hot, add the thyme, garlic, onion and bay leaves. Fry for a minute.
  4. Add the pork and season with salt, pepper and paprika. Stir until the pork has turned golden brown all over.  This may take about 5 minutes.
  5. Stir in the saffron.
  6. Pour in the wine, vinegar and chopped tomatoes.
  7. Stir all the ingredients well, cover with a lid and simmer for 5 minutes.
  8. Cover the casserole pan and then put it on the middle shelf of the pre-heated oven.  Leave for 1 hour.
  9. Check and adjust the seasoning.  Also add the marrow and flat green beans.
  10. Cook for a further 40 minutes at a lower temperature of 160ºC.

 

 

Biko From Alma’s Kitchen

Biko, photo by PH Morton

Biko From Alma’s Kitchen

My sister-in-law, Alma is a very capable woman.  A good example of a decent human being.  She is friendly, she is caring, she can’t do enough to be helpful to anyone.

She is well like by everyone.

Her abilities go on and on.  What I like most about her is her cooking.  She can really cook up a storm.

Her biko is to die for.  Peter, my English hubby, who do not usually eat anything made of rice love’s Alma’s biko.

The above photo was from Alma’s kitchen.  Doesn’t it look so delicious?  And it was so yummy.

Click here for the recipe!

Biko a a favourite of mine.  It reminds me of happy childhood and young adulthood in the Philippines. It reminds me of my loving family, cheerful, always ready for a laugh and adventure.

I remember my mother going to market and coming home with biko, which we would share and enjoy.

I remember my grandfather coming home with ‘pasalubong’ of biko, amongst others, when he goes out.

Biko is a symbol of halcyon days for me!

Egg & Tuna Salad

Boiled eggs

Egg & Tuna Salad

Ingredients:

6 eggs, hard boiled

1 small can tuna, flaked

2 stalks celery, sliced finely

4 tablespoon mayonnaise

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Procedure:

  • Remove the shell off  and then carefully cut into the pointed end of the eggs.  From this incision, delicately take out the yolks.
  • Set aside the outer egg white as these will be used as an outer casing for the stuffing later on.
  • Mash the egg yolks in a bowl.  Finely chop the egg whites cut off from the pointed end of the boiled eggs and then add these to the mashed yolks.
  • Mix in the tuna and celery.
  • Add the mayonnaise.  Give it a good stir.
  • Season with salt and pepper.
  • Now divided this tuna and egg stuffing and use this to fill in the egg white casings.  Keep everything tidy.
  • Serve in a bed of shredded lettuce.

 

 

Pioppi Diet, Secret to Living Longer?

Olive Oil

Pioppi Diet, Secret to Living Longer?

 

What is a Pioppi Diet?

Apparently there is a small village in Italy called Pioppi, where the average life span of a man is 89 and some lived to a hundred.  In this village, the ails of old age like dementia and diabetes are practically unheard of.

It is also interesting to note that American physiologist, Ancel Keys, who first authored the Mediterranean Diet, which by the way is now protected by UNESCO under the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, stayed in Pioppi for 28 years.  He left this beloved village at age 100 and died soon after at age 101.

It is being claimed that adhering to the Pioppi Diet can regulate the insulin and help to lose excess fat, thus lowering the risk of contracting many types of diseases and illnesses.

 

Guidelines for the Pioppi Diets in a nutshell:

 

These are the Dos:
  • Eat plenty of fibrous vegetables and whole fruits.
  • Keep eating red meat.  (I like)
  • Eat a handful of tree nuts everyday.  (like coconut?!!!, probably not, perhaps like almonds, walnuts, chestnuts but not peanut as it is legume)
  • Walk for at least half an hour a day.
  • Fast for 24 hours each week.  (Nooooooooo)
  • Eat three meals a day. Sup until you are full.
  • Enjoy a glass of red wine.
  • Do breathing exercises four times a day.
  • Sleep sever hours a night.
  • Have at least 2 tablespoonful of extra-virgin olive oil a day.
These are the Don’ts:
  • Do not eat added sugars, including fruit juice, honey and syrup.
  • Do not use seed oils, such as rapeseed, sunflower and soya bean oil.
  • Do not eat refined carbs such as in bread, pasta, noodles, cakes and biscuits (kill me now!)
  • Do not sit still for more than 45 minutes at a time.  Get moving!

Probiotics Vs Prebiotics

I have to admit that I have not really thought of prebiotics in great details before. I don’t know much about it and how it is different from the more familiar probiotics.  The birth of the yogurty drink called Yakult made sure of that. We know that probiotics has something to do with live bacteria, which is good for you.

To get the lowdown of these two bodies of science, below is chart from www.positive healthwellness.com

Probiotics Vs Prebiotics

PositiveHealthWellness

Probiotics And Prebiotics: What’s The Difference?

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