Category: Food Facts

Brussels Sprouts

Brussel sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are full of goodness.  They contain a lot of folate and indoles, which are bioflavanoids and nitrogen compound. Indoles are supposed to reduce the risk of cancer.

Brussels sprout is cabbage lookalike in miniature. And like cabbage, brussels sprout can cause flatulence.

Choose small green ones and they can be store in the fridge in a paper bag.  Keep them unwashed to prevent them going yellow and tasting bitter and soggy when cooked.

And they got their name from Brussels in Belgium.

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

Fennel Bulb, photo by PH Morton

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

Fennel is related to the carrot family and indigenous to the Mediterranean but they are now grown in many parts of the world.

It is a perennial herb with yellow flowers. It is very aromatic.

Fennel is very versatile.  The bulbs, see above, foliage (leaves) and seeds are widely used in culinary around the world.

The bulb is delicious drizzled in olive oil and balsamic vinegar and then baked in the oven.  It is sweet tasting, perfect starter or as a side dish with roast meat or even baked fish dishes.

Click here for the baked fennel bulb.

Persimmon (Sharon Fruit)

Persimmon, photo by PH Morton

Persimmon (Sharon Fruit)

Fruit Bowl, photo by PH Morton

Our fruit bowl is getting more adventures.  Early this new year, we have custard apple, passion fruit, mangoes, kiwi, several types of citrus fruits such as lemon, lime orange, grapefruit and nectarine.

We also have persimmon, which is apparently also called Sharon fruit.  Its scientific name is Diospyros Kaki.  This fruit is often seedless and sweet.  It can be eaten as a whole fruit; there is no need to peel it (but you can of course, if you wanted to.)

Sharon fruit can be eaten fresh, or cooked (in a pie) and even preserved.

Its orange colouring shouts richness in beta carotene and it is actually is a good source.

Passion Fruit

Passion fruit, photo by PH Morton

Passion Fruit

Photo by PH Morton

Passion fruit is sweet with a tinge of sourness.  It is very seedy.  The seeds are soft and edible.

The scientific name for passion fruit is Passiflora edulis. It comes from a vine rather than a tree.

It is native to South America.

Did you know?

To tell whether the fruit is ripe is to look at the skin.  When the outer skin has shriveled then it is ripe.  The shriveled the skin the riper it is.

 

 

Korean Perilla Leaves

Korean Perilla Leaves, photo by PH Morton

Korean Perilla Leaves

I often see in Korean dramas that they eat their barbecued  thin pork or beef slices wrapped in the same leaves as above.  Of course they also use the standard lettuce leaf.

Anyway, Peter and I fancied a bit of change for the new year so we decided to create our on table-top barbecue dinner a la Korean. and also a delicious warming hotpot.

But first off, we went shopping for the ingredients.  We went to Seoul Plaza in Golders Green, North London.  I happened to see these leaves amidst the ready made Korean side dishes.  It was about £1.99 for a packet of 20 leaves.

We did our barbecue and duly wrapped pieces of meat with kimchi, radish and sauces into a perilla leaf.  It tasted really good.  The leaf has an aromatic minty scent with a herby taste.  I actually preferred it to the crisp iceberg lettuce.  Peter also love the perilla leaves.  I think we would use more of it in the future.

Perilla apparently is a member of the mint family.  It grows from seed and very easy to cultivate.  But where can you get the seeds?!!!  If you are from the UK  and know where to get them in London, please kindly let us know!!!

bbq pork wrapped in perilla leaf, photo by PH Morton

Pomelo (Suha) – Citrus Fruit

Pomelo, photo by Ruben Ortega

Pomelo (Suha) – Citrus Fruit

Pomelo is called suha in Tagalog and dogmon in Ilocano.

It is 3 to 4 times the size of a grapefruit and can be as big as a melon.  In fact pomelo is the largest citrus fruit that it has acquired a scientific name of citrus maxima or citrus grandis.

Pomelo is closely related to the grapefruit, but I actually prefer suha as I find grapefruit can be rather bitter.

The pomelo tree can grow really tall and when it flowers, the little cluster of white blossoms has the most fragrant smell.

Pomelo is rich in vitamin C.  Really juicy and when fully ripen in the tree, it can be very sweet.

But I actually love a pomelo that it still just before it truly ripen.  I love the slight sour taste which a little sprinkle of salt will activate the salivary gland.  Just thinking of this now makes my mouth water. Actually I prefer when the flesh of the pomelo is left to steep in a dish of slightly salty vinegar.  Delicious.

Suha, photo by Ruben Ortega

The juicy flesh here is pink but suha can also be yellowish white.

Postulant Cook’s Guide to Choosing Cheeses

 

Cheese for afters, photo by JMorton

Postulant Cook

Postulant Cook’s Guide to Choosing Cheeses

Now that Christmas is almost upon us, we have to start thinking what cheese or cheeses will grace our dining table.

Of course cheese is popular all year round but there is something special about nibbling on a selection of cheeses, wash down with a glass or few of red wine during the Christmas holidays.  (Please note though that we do not promote drinking and driving!!!)

Below is my favourite cheeses, which I hope will help in making your own selection.

Blue Cheese

Brie

Cheddar Cheese

Goat Cheese

Emmental

Feta

Wensleydale

Ah, Wensleydale! The Mozart of cheeses.
-T.S. Eliot

%d bloggers like this: