Category: Filipino Recipe

Pangat Na Sapsap (Recipe 2)

Sapsap is widely available in the Philippines.  It is as popular fish in the Philippines.
They are not much bigger than the palm of your hand but they are surprisingly fleshy.
Pangat is the most popular way to cook sapsap which is delicious served with freshly boiled rice or fried rice, Filipino style.

Pangat Na Sapsap (Recipe 2)

Ingredients:
2½ lbs fresh sapsap, gutted and cleaned
2 lemons, juiced or 10 large calamansi, juiced
Salt, according to taste but perhaps with a teaspoonful
3 tbsp cooking oil
Method of Preparation
1. Prepare the fish and then drain off excess water.
2. Arrange the fish on a cooking pot or casserole pan.
3. Sprinkle the salt and then pour in the juice all over the fish.
4. Cover the pan and cook for 7-10 minutes until the fish have tuned whitely opaque.
5,  Serve immediately with freshly boiled rice and some tomato and shallot salad.
Enjoy
PS For the tomato-based pangat recipe please click here.

Pinakbet with Bagoong Alamang

Pinakbet. photo by Ruben Ortega

Pinakbet with Bagoong Alamang

This version of pinakbet uses bagoong alamang which is a  shrimp paste instead of fermented salted fish bagoong.

This pinakbet is a little milder in taste but it has its own merit all the same.

Ingredients

 

  • 1 large eggplant (aubergine), sliced
  • 1 large ampalaya (bitter gourd), seeds and pith removed, then sliced
  • 6 pieces okra (ladies’ finger), sliced diagonally in half
  • 4 sigarilyas (winged beans), sliced diagonally
  • 50g string beans, cut into 2 inches lengths.
  • 1/2 medium squash, peeled and sliced (refer to the photo above)
  • 2 medium tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 1/2 lbs pork belly, sliced
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped finely
  • 4 tablespoons of bagoong alamang (this can be bought at most Oriental food shop)
  • 2 1/2 cups water

 Method of Preparation:

 

  1. Using a lidded casserole pan, boil the pork with half of the water.
  2. Cook until the water has evaporated and the pork is tender.
  3. Stir fry the pork in its own oil until it has turned golden brown.
  4. Add the ampalaya, squash, okras, tomatoes and onion.
  5. Spoon in the bagoong alamang and stir it in thoroughly with the pork and vegetable.  Cook for 2 minutes.
  6. Pour in the remaining water, cover the casserole and leave to simmer for 7 minutes.
  7. Add the sigarilyas and string beans.
  8. Cook for 5 minutes or until the sigarilyas and string beans tender but it is crispy.  Do not cover the casserole to maintain the beautiufl vivid colouring of the sigarilyas and string beans.

Enjoy with a freshly boiled rice.

Absolutely delicious.

Again, this can be a vegetarian delight by not adding the pork. 😉

 

Patupat – Ilocano Glutinous Rice Dessert

Patupat, photo by Arnold Gamboa

Patupat – Ilocano Glutinous Rice Dessert

Patupat is a specialty of the Ilocanos.  It is a sweet glutinous rice cake.

Depending on which part of the Ilocos region, patupat can be wrapped in banana leaves or with intricately woven palm or banana leaves.

The photo below shows the specialty of Pangasinan, patupat encased in woven basket of palm leaves.

 

Pork Leg Asado With Pineapple

Pork Leg Asado, Photo by Ruben Ortega

Pork Leg Asado With Pineapple

This recipe is as good tasting as the photo shows.  The secret to this is marinating the meat in order for the sauce to get into all the crevices of the meat sinews.

Ingredients

 

  • 2 lbs pork leg, chopped to the bone into manageable pieces
  • 1½ cup water
  • 1/2 tsp whole blackpeppers
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1/2 tbsp oil
  • 1 inch cube butter
  •  1 large white onion, peeled chopped finely
  • 1 lemon or 1½ tbsp of fresh calamansi juice
  • 3/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1 small can of pineapple

 Method of Preparation:

 

  1. Using a large bowl, mix together the soy sauce, blackpeppers and lemon juice (or calamansi juice)
  2. Stir in the sliced pork leg and leave to marinate for an hour (or overnight in the fridge).
  3. Drain the meat but keep the marinade.
  4. Heat a large lidded frying pan or a casserole pan.
  5. Add the oil and then the butter.
  6. Fry the meat and cook until golden brown on both sides.
  7. Pour in the marinade and also the water.
  8. Drop in the bay leaves.
  9. Cover the pan and leave the meat to simmer until the meat is tender.
  10. Add the can of pineapple, including the juice, and cook for another 7 minutes.
  11. Serve immediately with a freshly boiled rice or green salad.

Enjoy

 

 

Adidas Adobo (Chicken Feet Adobo)

Chicken feet Adobo, photo by Ruben Ortega

chicken feet, photo by PH Morton

Adidas is the name given to chicken feet.  Obviously as a homage to the great trainers brand.

The raw chicken feet photo was taken by Peter during one of our shopping at the wet market of Pritil in Tondo, Manila, Philippines.

To be truthful, I have not really tasted chicken feet before but Peter had.  He said it was taste but rather rubbery.  I’ll take his word for it.  🙂

Ingredients

  • 1-2 lbs chicken feet, cleaned thoroughly
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon whole peppercorn
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1/2 tablespoon sugar
  • 5-6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 tsp dried chilli
  • 3-4 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1½ cups water

 

 Method of Preparation:

  1. Clean the chicken feet thoroughly and trim all claws.  Butchers usually would have trimmed the scary claws already. 🙂
  2. Heat a large saucepan or a wok and add the chicken feet with the soy sauce, vinegar and water.
  3. Also add the bay leaves, peppercorn, sugar and half of the crushed garlic.  Do not stir.  Bring this to a boil and then lower down the heat and leave to simmer for three quarters of an hour. (45 minutes)
  4. Remove the chicken feet from the remaining liquid.  Drain and then set aside the stewed feet. Do not discard the liquid sauce from the wok.  Pour in a container and set aside.
  5. Clean the wok and heat.
  6. Add the oil.  Stir in the remaining garlic and fry until fragrant.
  7. Add the dried chilli.
  8. Stir in the fried chicken feet and fry until sizzling hot.
  9. Pour in the liquid sauce and heat for a minute or two.
  10. Transfer into a serving bowl and enjoy with a few beers.

Spicy Spare Ribs in Banana Ketchup

Spare ribs, photo by Mae Mercado-Sanguer

Spicy Spare Ribs in Banana Ketchup

Banana ketchup has a very distinct taste.  It is sweet and spicy.

Apparently this condiment was created during the second world war by a Filipina food technologist, Maria Y. Oroza.

This came about because there was a shortage of tomatoes but there was an abundance of bananas.

What does Maria have to do to assuage hungry tummies wanting sauce for their less than appetising meagre repast.  Eureka!  Banana ketchup!

Not before long, Mafran was mass producing the product and the rest is history.

Banana ketchup is not just a condiment for the dinner table.  It has become a major ingredients in many a Filipino recipes such as in Filipinised Spaghetti Bolognese, omelette, etc.

Below is a spare rib recipe, which by the way can be made from beef or pork.  To maximise the taste, it is advisable to leave the ribs to marinate overnight.

 

Ingredients

  • 2½ lbs beef or pork spare ribs
  • 1 can Sprite or 7Up
  • salt
  • Oil for frying
  • 1 cup Banana Ketchup
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced to a paste
  • 3 tbsp butter or margarine
  • 2 bird’s eye chillies (labuyo), chopped finely
  • 2 onions, chopped finely
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tbsp caster sugar

Method of Preparation:

  • Wash the ribs and let it drain.  Rub them with salt and then set aside for 15 minutes.
  • Put the ribs in a large bowl and Pour the Sprite or 7Up over.  Leave to marinate for half and hour.
  • Using a mixing bowl, put together the banana ketchup, garlic, butter or margarine, chillies, onions, black pepper, bay leaf and caster sugar.  Give it a thorough mix.
  • Pour this to the marinating ribs in Sprite.  Give it a good stir to cover the meat completely.
  • Cover the bowl of ribs with cling film and leave in the fridge overnight.
  • Heat the oil in a large pan or deep-fryer.
  • Scrape off the juices and sauces from the ribs and carefully lower into the hot oil.  Fry them in batches.
  • Cook until golden all over.
  • Pour the marinade into a pan and heat until bubbling hot.
  • Serve this as a sauce for the ribs.
  • Enjoy with some salad and boiled rice a la Filipino style. 🙂

 

Fried Chicken (Filipino Recipe)

Fried Chicken, photo by Mae Mercado-Sanguer

Fried Chicken (Filipino Recipe)

 

Ingredients

  • 1 whole chicken, cut into segment pieces
  • 4-5 cloves garlic, peeled and pounded into paste
  • 2 tbsp cider vinegar
  • 1 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper (according to taste
  • oil for deep-frying

Method of Preparation:

  • Wash the chicken pieces and drain thoroughly, then place in a large bowl.
  • Put it the garlic in a separate container.
  • Pour in the soy sauce and vinegar over the garlic.
  • Season with a bit of salt and a good amount of freshly ground black pepper for spice.
  • Give it a thorough mix.
  • Pour this mixture over the chicken pieces.  Ensure that all the pieces get a soak in.
  • Cover the bowl with cling film and leave to marinate for a couple of hours.
  • Drain the chicken pieces and fry in deep hot oil over medium heat.  Cook until golden brown all over.
  • Serve hot with some salad and of course unli rice. 🙂  (unlimited rice)

 

Kilawing Puso Ng Saging (Banana Heart Ceviche)

Kilawing Puso Ng Saging by Rosie Reyes- Barrera

Kilawing Puso Ng Saging (Banana Heart Ceviche)

This recipe is one of my favourite.  It slight sour taste makes for a good hearty meal.

Ingredients

  • 1 banana blossom (a can of banana blossom from Asian supermarket)
  • 1 cup coconut milk (fresh or canned)
  • 2 large tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 50 g of cooked pork, sliced into thin strips (optional)
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2 tbsp vinegar
  • salt & freshly ground black pepper

 

Method of Preparation:

  • Prepare the banana blossom (if using the fresh sort) by removing and discarding the tough outer layers.  Then slice thinly crosswise.
  • Soak the slices in salty water for 10 minutes.  Then squeeze until most of the liquid had been drained out.  The procedure is to remove any bitter taste from the banana heart (if only you can also do this with the human heart 🙂 lol)
  • Rinse the banana heart slices in cold water and then set aside to drain.
  • Heat the oil in a wok or a large frying pan.
  • Saute the garlic until aromatic and golden brown, please do not burn, otherwise it will leave a bitter taste.
  • Add the onion and the tomatoes to the garlic and allow to cook for 3 minutes until the tomatoes are softened and the onion translucent.
  • Stir in the banana blossom as well as the pork (if using)
  • Season with salt and freshly ground pepper.  Add the vinegar and leave to simmer for 2 minutes.
  • Pour in the coconut milk.  Give it a stir and cook for a couple of minutes more.
  • Remove from heat and serve immediately with freshly boiled rice.

 

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