Category: Filipino Recipe

Ginataang Sitaw at Kalabasa (Green beans & Squash With Coconut Milk)

Ginataang sitaw at kalabasa with fried fish, photo by Mae Mercado-Sanguer

Ginataang Sitaw at Kalabasa (Green beans & Squash With Coconut Milk)

I am very partial to recipes that call for coconut milk.  It makes the dish creamy and rich tasting.  Just love it.

I urge you to try this recipe as it is really something.

This recipe uses meat.  Another recipe we have uses shrimps, which is equally good.

Ingredients:

  • 1 small or 1/2 a squash or pumpkin, peeled, deseeded and cubed
  • 200g string beans (green beans), cut into about 1½ to 2 inches lengths.
  • 100 g pork, cut into bite-size pieces.
  • 1½ cups water
  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • 5 cloves garlic, chopped or minced finely
  • 1/4 cup shrimp paste (bagoong na alamang) or 1¼ tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 onion, peeled and sliced thinly
  • 1½tbsp vegetable oil
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Preparation:

  • Heat the oil in a wok or large frying pan.
  • Sauté the garlic and onion.
  • Add the pork and stir-fry until golden all over.
  • Stir in the shrimp paste, if using.
  • Pour in the water, bring to a boil, reduce the heat and leave to simmer until most of the liquid had evaporated and the meat had softened.
  • Drop in the squash and string beans.
  • If not using shrimp paste, then add the fish sauce.
  • Pour in the coconut milk and continue to stir well until it begins to boil.
  • Adjust the seasoning by adding salt and black pepper according to your taste.

Delicious served with freshly boiled rice and any leftover is fantastic as breakfast with some fried rice.

Blackberries in Salt & Vinegar

Blackberries in vinegar, photo by JMorton

I am currently watching the semi-finals between England and Croatia.  England dominated the first half with a 1-nil to England.

As it is half-time, I suddenly craved something sour.  I spied at around lunchtime that the blackberries, growing wildly in our garden are now ripening.

Actually, I picked those which are not fully ripe yet.  They taste better in vinegar and they are crispier and crunchier with that burst of sour taste.

When the blackberries are fully ripe, I will be baking a blackberry and apple crumble.

If you want to try my sour blackberries, then half a cup to half a cup of firm ripening blackberries.  Wash thoroughly and drain.

Add to it a tablespoon of red wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar.  These vinegars have that spicy and wonderful smell about it, really sour.

Then sprinkle a little salt, give it a stir.

Ready to crunch,

Yum

Sadly a young, relatively inexperienced and talented England team lost 2-1 in extra time, but far exceeded expectations with hope for the future. I still enjoyed my snack 🙂

Blackberries in Salt & Vinegar

 

 

Pangat Na Sapsap (Recipe 2)

Sapsap is widely available in the Philippines.  It is as popular fish in the Philippines.
They are not much bigger than the palm of your hand but they are surprisingly fleshy.
Pangat is the most popular way to cook sapsap which is delicious served with freshly boiled rice or fried rice, Filipino style.

Pangat Na Sapsap (Recipe 2)

Ingredients:
2½ lbs fresh sapsap, gutted and cleaned
2 lemons, juiced or 10 large calamansi, juiced
Salt, according to taste but perhaps with a teaspoonful
3 tbsp cooking oil
Method of Preparation
1. Prepare the fish and then drain off excess water.
2. Arrange the fish on a cooking pot or casserole pan.
3. Sprinkle the salt and then pour in the juice all over the fish.
4. Cover the pan and cook for 7-10 minutes until the fish have tuned whitely opaque.
5,  Serve immediately with freshly boiled rice and some tomato and shallot salad.
Enjoy
PS For the tomato-based pangat recipe please click here.

Pinakbet with Bagoong Alamang

Pinakbet. photo by Ruben Ortega

Pinakbet with Bagoong Alamang

This version of pinakbet uses bagoong alamang which is a  shrimp paste instead of fermented salted fish bagoong.

This pinakbet is a little milder in taste but it has its own merit all the same.

Ingredients

 

  • 1 large eggplant (aubergine), sliced
  • 1 large ampalaya (bitter gourd), seeds and pith removed, then sliced
  • 6 pieces okra (ladies’ finger), sliced diagonally in half
  • 4 sigarilyas (winged beans), sliced diagonally
  • 50g string beans, cut into 2 inches lengths.
  • 1/2 medium squash, peeled and sliced (refer to the photo above)
  • 2 medium tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 1/2 lbs pork belly, sliced
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped finely
  • 4 tablespoons of bagoong alamang (this can be bought at most Oriental food shop)
  • 2 1/2 cups water

 Method of Preparation:

 

  1. Using a lidded casserole pan, boil the pork with half of the water.
  2. Cook until the water has evaporated and the pork is tender.
  3. Stir fry the pork in its own oil until it has turned golden brown.
  4. Add the ampalaya, squash, okras, tomatoes and onion.
  5. Spoon in the bagoong alamang and stir it in thoroughly with the pork and vegetable.  Cook for 2 minutes.
  6. Pour in the remaining water, cover the casserole and leave to simmer for 7 minutes.
  7. Add the sigarilyas and string beans.
  8. Cook for 5 minutes or until the sigarilyas and string beans tender but it is crispy.  Do not cover the casserole to maintain the beautiufl vivid colouring of the sigarilyas and string beans.

Enjoy with a freshly boiled rice.

Absolutely delicious.

Again, this can be a vegetarian delight by not adding the pork. 😉

 

Patupat – Ilocano Glutinous Rice Dessert

Patupat, photo by Arnold Gamboa

Patupat – Ilocano Glutinous Rice Dessert

Patupat is a specialty of the Ilocanos.  It is a sweet glutinous rice cake.

Depending on which part of the Ilocos region, patupat can be wrapped in banana leaves or with intricately woven palm or banana leaves.

The photo below shows the specialty of Pangasinan, patupat encased in woven basket of palm leaves.

 

Pork Leg Asado With Pineapple

Pork Leg Asado, Photo by Ruben Ortega

Pork Leg Asado With Pineapple

This recipe is as good tasting as the photo shows.  The secret to this is marinating the meat in order for the sauce to get into all the crevices of the meat sinews.

Ingredients

 

  • 2 lbs pork leg, chopped to the bone into manageable pieces
  • 1½ cup water
  • 1/2 tsp whole blackpeppers
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1/2 tbsp oil
  • 1 inch cube butter
  •  1 large white onion, peeled chopped finely
  • 1 lemon or 1½ tbsp of fresh calamansi juice
  • 3/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1 small can of pineapple

 Method of Preparation:

 

  1. Using a large bowl, mix together the soy sauce, blackpeppers and lemon juice (or calamansi juice)
  2. Stir in the sliced pork leg and leave to marinate for an hour (or overnight in the fridge).
  3. Drain the meat but keep the marinade.
  4. Heat a large lidded frying pan or a casserole pan.
  5. Add the oil and then the butter.
  6. Fry the meat and cook until golden brown on both sides.
  7. Pour in the marinade and also the water.
  8. Drop in the bay leaves.
  9. Cover the pan and leave the meat to simmer until the meat is tender.
  10. Add the can of pineapple, including the juice, and cook for another 7 minutes.
  11. Serve immediately with a freshly boiled rice or green salad.

Enjoy

 

 

Adidas Adobo (Chicken Feet Adobo)

Chicken feet Adobo, photo by Ruben Ortega

chicken feet, photo by PH Morton

Adidas is the name given to chicken feet.  Obviously as a homage to the great trainers brand.

The raw chicken feet photo was taken by Peter during one of our shopping at the wet market of Pritil in Tondo, Manila, Philippines.

To be truthful, I have not really tasted chicken feet before but Peter had.  He said it was taste but rather rubbery.  I’ll take his word for it.  🙂

Ingredients

  • 1-2 lbs chicken feet, cleaned thoroughly
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon whole peppercorn
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1/2 tablespoon sugar
  • 5-6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 tsp dried chilli
  • 3-4 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1½ cups water

 

 Method of Preparation:

  1. Clean the chicken feet thoroughly and trim all claws.  Butchers usually would have trimmed the scary claws already. 🙂
  2. Heat a large saucepan or a wok and add the chicken feet with the soy sauce, vinegar and water.
  3. Also add the bay leaves, peppercorn, sugar and half of the crushed garlic.  Do not stir.  Bring this to a boil and then lower down the heat and leave to simmer for three quarters of an hour. (45 minutes)
  4. Remove the chicken feet from the remaining liquid.  Drain and then set aside the stewed feet. Do not discard the liquid sauce from the wok.  Pour in a container and set aside.
  5. Clean the wok and heat.
  6. Add the oil.  Stir in the remaining garlic and fry until fragrant.
  7. Add the dried chilli.
  8. Stir in the fried chicken feet and fry until sizzling hot.
  9. Pour in the liquid sauce and heat for a minute or two.
  10. Transfer into a serving bowl and enjoy with a few beers.
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