Tag: George Orwell

Dog Tags…Human Tags?

Lasmicrochip detectort Friday, we took our lively little terrier dog to the veterinary surgeon (vets). He had his routine vaccination. The vet also checked that his implanted microchip was working  OK.

In the UK by law,  all pet dogs have to have microchips implanted (normally near the neck).  The microchip  is about the size of a grain of rice. It consists of a tiny computer chip housed in a type of glass made to be compatible with living tissue. The microchip is implanted between the dog’s shoulder blades under the skin with a needle and special syringe. The process is similar to getting an injection with little or no to no pain.  Once in place, the microchip can be detected immediately with a handheld device that uses radio waves to read the chip. This device scans the microchip, and then displays a unique alphanumeric code. Once the microchip is placed, the dog must be registered with the microchip company, usually for a one-time fee. Then, the dog can be traced back to the owner if found.

Dog Tags…Human Tags?microchip

 

Microchip and detector

Microchip implant size

Microchip implant size

This made me think to the future and all the surveillance and communication technology we have and use in the 21st Century.

Today, we use an increasing amount  of  Radio-frequency identification (RFID)  wireless  devices to monitor movements/location of people or items. Shops/stores use RFID for stock control  or used to asset tag for inventories.

Indeed many of our smart phones, PC tablets can be tracked through built-in RFID devices.  Cars and vehicles  have RFID.

This technology is invaluable in locating/tracking  lost or stolen pets & valuable items.

Ever increasing sophisticated implanted microchips would also provide a range  medical benefits for monitoring health and even adjusting critical bodily functions to keep us healthy.

I wonder if, or indeed when humans maybe similarly ‘microchipped’ and have RFID implanted to monitor us . We would have a truly ‘Big Brother’  Orwellian 1984 nightmare, where the locations and status of all citizens are known or can be found by the government, regimes etc.

At birth or soon after, would all children have micro-chip implants by law and  registered along side the Birth Certificate process!?

Possibly the microchip(s) would only be activated for specific, appropriate and lawful needs?

humn log

Possibly known criminals,terrorists  etc.,  will be implanted with microchips active for their lifetimes or for a fixed period.  This would make policing immeasurably  more effective but remove fundamental human rights.

 

 

George Orwell

George Orwell was the pen name of the novelist, political writer and journalist Eric Arthur Blair.


Orwell was a British journalist and author, who wrote two of the most famous novels of the 20th century ‘Animal Farm’ and ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’.

Orwell was born Eric Arthur Blair on 25 June 1903 in eastern India, the son of a British colonial civil servant. He was educated in England and, after he left Eton, joined the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, then a British colony. He resigned in 1927 and decided to become a writer. In 1928, he moved to Paris where lack of success as a writer forced him into a series of menial jobs. He described his experiences in his first book, ‘Down and Out in Paris and London’, published in 1933. He took the name George Orwell, shortly before its publication. This was followed by his first novel, ‘Burmese Days’, in 1934.

An anarchist in the late 1920s, by the 1930s he had begun to consider himself a socialist. In 1936, he was commissioned to write an account of poverty among unemployed miners in northern England, which resulted in ‘The Road to Wigan Pier’ (1937). Late in 1936, Orwell travelled to Spain to fight for the Republicans against Franco’s Nationalists. He was forced to flee in fear of his life from Soviet-backed communists who were suppressing revolutionary socialist dissenters. The experience turned him into a lifelong anti-Stalinist.

Between 1941 and 1943, Orwell worked on propaganda for the BBC. In 1943, he became literary editor of the Tribune, a weekly left-wing magazine. By now he was a prolific journalist, writing articles, reviews and books.

In 1945, Orwell’s ‘Animal Farm’ was published. A political fable set in a farmyard but based on Stalin’s betrayal of the Russian Revolution, it made Orwell’s name and ensured he was financially comfortable for the first time in his life. ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ was published four years later. Set in an imaginary totalitarian future, the book made a deep impression, with its title and many phrases – such as ‘Big Brother is watching you’, ‘newspeak’ and ‘doublethink’ – entering popular use. By now Orwell’s health was deteriorating and he died of tuberculosis on 21 January 1950.

Advertising is the rattling of a stick inside a swill-bucket
– George Orwell

….

Everyone knows that there is one law for the rich and another for the poor.  But no one accepts the implications of this, everyone takes it for granted that the law, such as it is, will be respected, and feels a sense of outrage when it is not.
– George Orwell

 

Good prose is like a window pane.

– George Orwell


Myths which are believed in, tend to be true.
– George Orwell

On the whole, human beings want to be good, but not too good, and not quite all the time.
– George Orwell

The more you are in the right, the more natural that everyone else should be bullied into thinking likewise.
– George Orwell

There are some ideas so wrong that only a very intelligent person could believe in them.
– George Orwell

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