Tag: Peter Higgs

Peter Higgs and Francois Englert win Nobel physics prize

There you go Peter, your namesake has finally been awarded the Nobel Physics prize for the Higgs Boson.

My Peter has been asking me why Peter Higgs has not been Nobel prized yet. They’ve found the particle, what else would they want?!!! LOL He asked me this question almost every other day. We do talk a lot about science! 😉

Anyway, one scientist – a really great one, will probably feel a little bit miffed with the Nobel Prize received by Peter Higgs. Yes I am talking about you, Stephen Hawking, you said they’ll never find this God Particle! Not to worry, Stephen, your non-faith does not diminish your genius. After all didn’t good old Albert Einstein also said that Quantum Mechanics was a mumbo jumbo?!!!

CONGRATULATIONS FROM GLOBALGRANARY.ORG TO PETER HIGGS AND FRANCOIS ENGLERT FOR THEIR MUCH DESERVED AWARD.

Jean
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Peter Higgs and Francois Englert win Nobel physics prize for Higgs boson research

 
By Tuesday 8 Oct 2013 12:27 pm
 

Higgs wins Nobel prize for 'God particle'
British physicist Peter Higgs, creator of the Higgs boson, has won the Nobel prize in physics (Picture: EPA)

Professor Peter Higgs has been awarded the Nobel prize in physics for predicting the existence of the Higgs boson or ‘God particle’.

The British scientist shared the award with Belgium’s Francois Englert for their theoretical work about the particle that is fundamental to explaining why elementary matter has mass.

‘I am overwhelmed to receive this award and thank the Royal Swedish Academy,’ said Prof Higgs said in a statement released by the University of Edinburgh.

‘I would also like to congratulate all those who have contributed to the discovery of this new particle and to thank my family, friends and colleagues for their support.

‘I hope this recognition of fundamental science will help raise awareness of the value of blue-sky research.’

epa03901813 (FILES) Belgian physicist Francois Englert (L) and British physicist Peter Higgs (R), answer journalist's question about the scientific seminar to deliver the latest update in the search for the Higgs boson at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin near Geneva, Switzerland, 04 July 2012. The two scientists have won the Nobel prize in physics for their work on the theory of the Higgs boson, it was announced 08 October 2013. Peter Higgs, from the UK, and Francois Englert from Belgium, shared the prize. EPA/MARTIAL TREZZINI
Belgian physicist Francois Englert (L) and British physicist Peter Higgs (R) shared the Nobel prize (Picture: EPA)

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement: ‘The awarded theory is a central part of the Standard Model of particle physics that describes how the world is constructed.

‘According to the Standard Model, everything, from flowers and people to stars and planets, consists of just a few building blocks: matter particles.’

The two scientists had been favourites to share the $1.25million (£780,000) prize after the elementary particle’s existence was confirmed at the European nuclear research facility in Geneva, Switzerland, last year.

(FILES) -- A file photo taken on July 19, 2013 shows a worker riding his bicycle in a tunnel of the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) Large Hadron Collider (LHC), during maintenance works in Meyrin, near Geneva. Francois Englert of Belgium and Peter Higgs of Britain won the Nobel Physics Prize on October 8, 2013 for the discovery of the "God particle", the Higgs Boson that explains why mass exists, the jury said. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINIFABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

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The existence of the ‘God particle’ was confirmed in Geneva last year (Picture: AFP / Geyyy)

Prime minister David Cameron tweeted saying: ‘Congratulations to Britain’s Professor Peter Higgs, who is sharing this year’s #NobelPrize for Physics.’

Scotland’s first minister Alex Salmond also congratulated Prof Higgs.

He said: ‘Today, the Higgs boson, which carries his name, is a scientific discovery which is renowned the world over.

‘This richly deserved honour not only highlights the quality of research carried out in Scotland, but also how science inspires us to look for answers to fundamental questions about life and the universe.’

Scientists had searched for the elusive ‘God particle’ for decades when its existence was finally confirmed.

Nobel prizes tend to go to ideas that stand the test of time and last year’s breakthrough was too recent to be considered for the 2012 award.

Englert and Higgs both theorised about the existence of the particle in the 1960s although Englert was reportedly first.

 

The Amazing Story of British Science

The British have a remarkable talent for keeping calm, even when there is no crisis.

– Franklin F. Jones

 

From the 1700s Britain, this small group of islands was and still is a leader in science and engineering. Surely Sir Isaac Newton must be regarded as the greatest scientist that ever lived. He formulated the laws or motion and gravity, proved that sun light was not pure white but made up of colour and corpuscular(tiny particles of matter)when he produced a spectrum via two prisms and isolated one colour. He invented the reflecting telescope and for mathematics he invented calculus still a valuable mathematic tool today. His discoveries about energy gravity and motion laid the ground for Einstein.

Below is an article about an excellent new BBC TV series charting the successes and discoveries made by British scientists and engineers.

The Amazing Story of British Science

Sir Isaac Newton, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Sir Tim Berners-Lee. Pictures via Getty

Britons Sir Isaac Newton, Isambard Kingdom Brunel and Sir Tim Berners-Lee all changed the world through their discoveries and inventions

Science Britannica 
Professor Brian Cox
Scientist and presenter

The British Isles are home to just one percent of the world’s population and yet our small collection of rocks poking out of the north Atlantic has thrown up world beaters in virtually every field of human endeavour.

Nowhere is this more obvious than in science and engineering. Edward Jenner came up with vaccines, Sir Frank Whittle ushered in the jet age and Sir Tim Berners-Lee laid the foundations of the world wide web for the Internet. Sir Isaac Newton, Robert Boyle, Charles Darwin, Michael Faraday, George Stephenson, James Watt, Isambard Kingdom Brunel (engineer), Francis Crick ( co discoverer of DNA)… the list is gloriously long.  We can now add Peter Higgs,who proposed the so called ‘God particle’ Higgs Bosun a field that holds particles together, which if if did not exist , sub atomic particles would never had formed into atoms and ultilmately us! The Higgs Bosun has been tentatively discovered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

What is it about Britain that allowed so many great minds to emerge and flourish?

This is a very important question to ask, because science and engineering are not only part of our past – the future of our economy depends to an ever-increasing extent on our continued excellence in scientific discovery and high-tech manufacturing and engineering.

The roots of our success can be traced back many centuries. Oxford and Cambridge Universities were formed over 800 years ago.

They paved the way for the world’s oldest scientific institution, The Royal Society, formed in 1660 by a group including Sir Christopher Wren, professor of astronomy and architect of St Paul’s Cathedral in London.

Science Heroes

 Robert Boyle Boyle 1627 – 1691 is one of  founders of modern chemistry and one of the pioneers of modern experimental scientific method which Britain gave to the world.  He is best known for Boyles Law  which describes the inversely proportional relationship between the absolute pressure and volume of a gas, if the temperature is kept constant within a closed sytem.

Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) was a brilliant physicist and mathematician who is considered a founding father of science.

Charles Darwin (1809 – 1882) was a naturalist and geologist who came up with the world-changing theory of evolution.

Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806-1859) was an inventor and engineer who designed some of the UK’s most famous tunnels, bridges, railway lines and ships

Sir Frank Whittle (1907 – 1996) was a daredevil test pilot who is credited with inventing the turbo jet engine

Sir Tim Berners-Lee (1955 – ) is the inventor of the world wide web

Scientist Rosalind Franklin’s photograph’s of X Ray diffraction of DNA confirmed it’s double helix structure

Any theory or idea about the world should be tested and if it disagrees with observations, then it is wrong.

Even today, that’s radical, because it means that the opinions of important and powerful people are worthless if they conflict with reality. So central is this idea to science that it is enshrined in The Royal Society’s motto: “Take nobody’s word for it”.

Shortly after The Royal Society was formed, Sir Isaac Newton deployed this approach in his great work The Principia, which contains his law of gravity and the foundations of what we now call classical mechanics – the tools you need to work out the forces on bridges and buildings, calculate paths of artillery shells and the stresses on aircraft wings. This was arguably the first work of modern physics.

This has become known as the scientific method, and its power can be seen in some unexpected places. During the filming of Science Britannica, I met Capt Jerry Roberts who worked at Bletchley Park during the Second World War.

Bletchley intercepted enemy messages and the captain and his colleagues were given the job of decoding them. He told me the story of his colleague, Bill Tutte, who worked on the ‘Tunny” code used by the Nazi high command to send orders to generals in the field.

Bill spent most of his time staring into space, but after just a few months, with awesome mathematical acumen he cracked the code.

In an age before computers, he did it using mathematics, logic and pencil and paper, aided by a single mistake by a German telegraph operator who sent a message twice. In the opinion of many, Tutte’s achievement was the greatest single intellectual achievement of the 20th Century, shortening the war by years and saving millions of lives on both sides.

This is what happens when genius is aided by the careful, scientific approach pioneered by Newton and others at The Royal Society. Capt Roberts and his colleagues at Bletchley are, in my view, heroes in every sense of the word.

 Bletchley Park was Britain’s main decryption establishment during World War II.

The Buckinghamshire compound is famous as the place where wartime codebreakers cracked the German Enigma code
Codebreaking machines Colossus and Bombe were the forerunners of modern computers. Mathematician Alan Turing helped create the Bombe
Historians estimate that breakthroughs at Bletchley shortened the war by two years
Bletchley Park’s computing  was so innovative
Alan Turing’s work built the foundations of computer science,programming etc. He is regarded as a true genius and founder of modern computing.

Another such genius was Nobel Prize winning phycisist Paul Dirac He was regarded by his friends and colleagues as unusual in character. Albert Einstein said of him “This balancing on the dizzying path between genius and madness is awful”  Among other discoveries, he formulated the Dirac Equation, which  predicted the existence of antimatter.

Despite its tremendous success, scientists have occasionally had a difficult relationship with the wider public. Frankenstein – the ultimate ‘scientist out of control’, has become a short-hand for things we fear.

A particularly colourful example can be found in the grim tale of George Forster, convicted of the double murder of his wife and daughter in 1803 and duly hanged.

This being the 19th Century, nobody was concerned about the hanging itself but rather illogically, the fate of Forster’s corpse caused a public outcry. It was taken directly to a nearby lecture theatre and used to demonstrate the effect of electricity on the human body.

The corpse twitched and jerked and even ‘opened an eye’ as an electric current was applied. There were reports of fainting and a particularly sensitive audience member died of shock – a wonderfully Georgian thing to do. The scientist – a visiting Italian called Giovanni Aldini – was forced to leave the country, when in fact his motives were absolutely sound. He was trying to resuscitate people using electricity.

Far from being a dangerous lunatic, he was ahead of his time. Nowadays thousands of lives are saved as hearts are regularly re-started using electrical pulses delivered by defibrillators.

Aldini’s controversial experiments were performed for a particular purpose, but not all science is carried out with a goal in mind.

Mary Shelley soon after wrote the classic gothic story Frankenstein, a cautionary tale of science out of control.

In the 19th Century, John Tyndall decided to work out why the vivid red and purple colours appeared when the sun is low, and why, for the rest of the time, the sky is blue.

He concluded that the colours of the sky are produced because light bounces off dust and water particles in the air. Blue light is more likely to bounce around than red, and so it is only when the sun is low and the light travels through more of the dust-filled air that the red light is bounced around to produce a sunset.

Tyndall was half right – we now know that it is mainly the air molecules themselves that scatter the light – but this didn’t really matter. Tyndall’s romantic curiosity led to a far more important discovery.

He decided to produce “pure” air with no particles in it, to see if the colours vanished, and he discovered that samples of meat didn’t rot in it. Here was evidence that infection and decay are caused by germs in the air – which Tyndall had inadvertently removed during his purification process. The discovery ultimately transformed the way that doctors dealt with infection and contamination.

Countless millions of lives were saved, because one curious scientist wanted to find out why the sky is blue. Today, the curiosity driven exploration of nature is still known as “blue skies research”.

Science has truly revolutionised our world. It is the basis of our economy and the foundation of our future. We must value our great heritage and continue to invest in education and science to ensure that we never lose our position as the best place in the world to do science.

Science Vs Religion

It’s a big, fat myth that all scientists are religion-hating atheists

Whether or not you think science is wonderful, the stereotype of all scientists being atheists is unrealistic. There is, however, a special dance

Detail from stained glass, Lincoln Cathedral

Science and religion: not mutually exclusive. (Detail from stained glass window at Lincoln Cathedral by Pommiebastards on Flickr)

Scientists used to be white guys in white lab coats with crazy hair, spectacles and an autistic inability to relate to other people. Now scientists are (mostly) white guys who are obsessed about the wonder of science and hate religion; and I think they all like Star Trek quite a bit too. This new religion-hating, super-awed scientist stereotype seems to based on some very strange amalgamation between Brian Cox andRichard Dawkins. And this cartoon-version of “what a scientist looks like” is all sort of tangled up in religion; where science pundits are either vilified because they are seen to all hate religion or almost worshiped like gods they supposedly detest.Ignoring that science and religion are really not the same thing, on the love side Cox has been said to resemble what God would have probably looked like “with hair that falls around his face like a helix”.

On the flip-side, popular scientists have been attacked for using the misty-eyed language of religion – because apparently using the word “wonder” ain’t allowed if you are an atheist or a scientist. As Eliane Glaser put it last week: “It’s ironic that the public engagement with the science crowd is so pro-wonder, because they’re so anti-religion.”

All scientists; religion haters. Also it is a little known fact but now when you get a physics PhD in the UK, you are given a job-lot of Wonderswallpaper for your new office and complementary D:Ream CD; which must be played on high days and holidays. We also learn a special dance but I am not allowed to talk about this.

I really hate to be the one to break the news, but scientist is not synonymous with atheist. Scientists also don’t all have the same gender, race, sexual orientation or political ideology, much less religion or lack thereof. Whether or not a person is religious, with respect to their vocation as a scientist, is completely irrelevant. Just like sexual orientation, race and gender should be irrelevant to being a scientist. Reinforcing the scientist = atheist stereotype, whether you are for it or against it, necessarily excludes people. No one should be excluded from science if they want to do it, be excited about it or read about it.

Richard Dawkins aside, the view that all scientists – even if they be atheists or famous people – hate religion is not really true. Peter Higgshas very sanguinely criticised Dawkins for his anti-religious stance, and goes on to say that he doesn’t think science and religion are incompatible. Brian Cox himself echoes the same sentiment. There are, moreover, a number of prominent openly religious scientists, such asFrances Collins, currently the head of the US National Institutes of Health; Gerhard Etrl who won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry (2007) andWilliam D Phillips who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1997. And this is just naming a few. Most scientists in the media don’t make a stand one way or another, perhaps because they too think it is irrelevant. Maybe this is a crazy idea but I am guessing a fair few scientists don’t like Star Trek either.

The cartoon stereotype that all scientists are religion-hating atheists isn’t just annoying; it is harmful. It is divisive and does nothing to encourage people into scientific discovery. In fact, it reinforces the idea that only a certain type of person can do science. This is not true. Professional science has enough diversity problems as it is, with women and minorities still grossly under-represented, without throwing religious-typing in there too. Public scientists and critics alike need to take a bit more care in lumping all scientists into the same stereotypical category. The world is much more complex than that.

• Dr Sylvia McLain runs a biophysics research group at Oxford. She is on Twitter – @girlinterruptin

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