Category: Photo of the Day

Barangay Election – Philippines

5th Annual Convention, Barrio Lieutenant Association of the Philippines, Eligio Wamil, 5th from left second row. the woman is Armi Kuusela

Barangay Election – Philippines

I thought I should post this Wamil Family memorabilia to honour the current barangay election that is gripping the Philippines.

As per above photo, my father was a former barrio captain or barrio lieutenant.  The photo was taken with Armi Kuusela, who was of course the very first MISS UNIVERSE!

She had to give up the crown in the middle of her reign to marry a very rich Filipino, Virgilio Hilario, after a very whirlwind courtship.  I think the one sitting on her right is Armi’s husband.

Anyway, looking at the above photo, my father was fifth from the left, second row, standing up. Well just look for the most handsome man, that is my father!  LOL 🙂

My father was the barrio captain of a paradise-like village of Marag.

What is a barangay in terms of a barrio?

A barangay was formerly known as a barrio. And it is the smallest administrative unit or district in the Philippines.

These villages or barrios or barangays are headed by cabeza del barrio also known as kapitan del barrio, barrio captain, also called as barrio lieutenant, teniente del barrio or the more modern Punong Barangay/ Barangay chairperson.

Barangay came from the word balangay, which is coined from the boat used by Austronesian (Malayo-Polynesian) people to migrate to the Philippines.

I have to say that these Austonesian people look so much like the Igorots of Mountain Province.

Anyway, please remember to vote wisely.  Elect those who are able, capable, and not prone to corruption.

Afterall, you get the people you choose!

 

 

2018 – Year of The Dog

2018 – Year of The Dog

You belong in the Years of the Dog if you were born in the year: 1934, 1946, 1958, 1970, 1982, 1994, 2006, 2018 and next one will be in 2030.

Nostalgia

2018 is a Fire Dog Year.

Lucky numbers are: 3,4 & 9

Lucky flowers:  Rose (you can’t never go wrong with this delicately scented blossom), oncidium, cymbidium, orchids.

Lucky colours are green, red and purple.

 

Persimmon (Sharon Fruit)

Persimmon, photo by PH Morton

Persimmon (Sharon Fruit)

Fruit Bowl, photo by PH Morton

Our fruit bowl is getting more adventures.  Early this new year, we have custard apple, passion fruit, mangoes, kiwi, several types of citrus fruits such as lemon, lime orange, grapefruit and nectarine.

We also have persimmon, which is apparently also called Sharon fruit.  Its scientific name is Diospyros Kaki.  This fruit is often seedless and sweet.  It can be eaten as a whole fruit; there is no need to peel it (but you can of course, if you wanted to.)

Sharon fruit can be eaten fresh, or cooked (in a pie) and even preserved.

Its orange colouring shouts richness in beta carotene and it is actually is a good source.

Here Comes October!

Clematis, Photo by JMorton

Clematis, Photo by JMorton

Here Comes October!

The month of October is harvest time.  It is Harvest Festival.

I can see glorious amounts of pumpkins and squashes rolling into the supermarkets ready for end of the month’s Halloween.

October also is the penultimate month for pay-days before Christmas!

October is when Christmas shopping starts to really rev up,.

The above photo shows a beautiful clematis, which will soon stop flowering and will be hibernating for the autumn and winter and will come to life again in the spring.  Blooming its mighty flowers, ready to delight the senses once again.

October heralds the last of the summer days into autumn.  The orange days of the year are upon us.

Kangkong (Water Spinach)

Kangkong, photo by JMorton

Kangkong (Water Spinach)

I love kangkong, or  called water spinach English.

Kangkong is a green leafy aquatic vegetable which is rich in vitamins and nutrients.

They have long slender leaves attached to a hollow tubular stem which is crunchy or there is a bite to it. Yummy

They usually grow in anything watery plot, in fields, swamp, lakes, river or even in bogs.

I remember that they grew near a dike in the middle of our rice field when we were still living in Marag.

Kangkong can grow rather vigorously and needed a good trim to prevent them from overpowering the water surface.  Good thing they are so edible and delicious.

I remember going into the waist-high water in our field to gather the kangkong sprouts.  I almost had a near panic attack after a carabao leech decided to attach itself to my stomach. It took ages to remove it and it seems the more you pull at it the longer its body gets, truly elastic.  That still gives me the nightmare to date.

My father did smoke whenever he plowed the field.  He would use the burning ember of the cigarette to unhook any pesky leech.

Oops, back to kangkong, they are delicious in sinigang recipes as well as blanched and made into a salad with lots of chopped tomatoes and shallots with a good dash of fish sauce.

Pisces Major by Jesse Watkins

Pisces, photo by PH Morton

Pisces @ RFH, photo by PH Morton

Pisces Major by Jesse Watkins

This huge silver sculpture apparently called Pisces Major was a piece by a British sculpture, Jesse Watkins (1899-1980).

Pisces Major is situated in front of the Royal Free Hospital in Hampstead.

It looks beautiful during the day as the sun catches its shiny silvery surface.  It is even more breath-taking when night falls as light dances, projecting many colours into the sculpture.

Croton Punctatum

Punctatum, photo by JMorton

Croton Punctatum

The above plant grows profusely in the Philippines, where the photo was taken.  It is apparently called punctatum of the croton family.

As a young girl, still living in Marag my sister and I would go to our neighbours, who grew the plants in their garden to give us cuttings.  The neighbours were so good to us that they would allow us to turn their once beautiful shrubs hedging their yards into stringy sorry sight of bald shrubs as if a ravenous swarm of locusts had been.  🙂 🙂 🙂

With our treasure of twigs of beautiful narrow verdant green leaves speckled with golden dust, we would dash home and plant these twigs in our front yard.  We would religiously water our new plant for at least a few days and then we forget as by then we moved on to another hobby.  Some of the twigs would live and some dries up and shrivelled under the punishing sun.

I must say that they do make a lovely hedge.  Their bright leaves have golden dusting and they are just beautiful under the sun.

 

%d bloggers like this: