Category: Food Preparation Tips

Cabbage Kimchi Recipe

Kimchi Recipe
Korean Recipe

Cabbage Kimchi Recipe

(Baechu Kimchi)

Kimchi, Photo by JMorton

Because of so many Kdramas that I have watched South Korean food had become rather family to me and my family.

It also helps that there are plenty of South Korean market nearby as well as restaurants.

Now and again when we crave South Korean food, we would go to Sarang in Golders Green or shop at Seoul Plaza (yes , in Golders Green) also.

Kimchi is as traditional as you can get as far as Korean cookery is concerned.  They always have them in ready access in their fridge.

Sometimes, if Kdrama is to be believed, kimchi making is a family affair.  They make them in batches and they then get distributed to each of the members of the family, if they leave away from home.

How to make kimchi?

Here is an easy to follow recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 1 large whole Napa/Chinese Cabbage (about 3kg)
  • 1 cup red chilli powder 🥵
  • 1 large radish (daikon) about 100g, peeled and julienned
  • 1/2 cup Chinese pear, peeled and julienned (50 g)
  • 1/3 cup salted shrimp
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 30g chopped chives
  • 1tsp chopped garlic
  • 1 tsp chopped ginger
  • 30g mustard leaves
  • 1 cup rock salt
  • 4 cups water

Method of Preparation:

  • Prepare the cabbage by removing and discarding the tough outer leaves.  Cut the cabbage in half lengthwise or if the cabbage is massive cut it in quarters, also lengthwise.
  • Find a large fairly flat container or basin and arrange the cabbage pieces into it.
  • Mix the 2/3 cup of rock salt into the 4 cups of water, pour this down into the cabbage pieces.  Ensure that the cabbage pieces are soaked into the water.  Sprinkle the remainder of the rock salt into the cabbages.
  • Soak for 10 hours but occasionally turn the pieces so all sides are soaked in the salted water.
  • After 10 hours, drain and was the cabbage pieces and leave to drain.
  • Meanwhile, mix the 1/3 cup of water with the chilli powder, creating some sort of a paste.
  • Using a big bowl, put together the julienned daikon radish and pear.
  • Mix in the chilli paste into the bowl.
  • Also add the salted shrimp, garlic, ginger and sugar.  Give this a thorough stir.
  • Add the drained cabbage and ensure that every orifice or side of the cabbage pieces is seasoned with the chilli mixture.
  • Add the chives, parsley and mustard leaves.  Tuck pieces of these into the cabbage, used the leaves to enclose the chilli mixture within.
  • Using a distilled super large jar, carefully fill it with the cabbage pieces
  • You can leave it to ferment in room temperature for 8 hours and it is done and you will have that raw tasting kimchi.
  • But if you wanted to leave it in the fridge, the fermentation is slower but it would last longer.

Enjoy!  You can use this in many recipes later such as Kimchi rice and kimchi stew.

 

Korean Iced-Coffee (Naeng-Keopi) Recipe

I was watching my favourite South Korean vlogger, Maangchi doing a demonstration on how to make a naeng-keopi, which is a South Korean iced coffee.

She made it looked so easy to make with a minimal sort of ingredients.

Korean Iced-Coffee (Naeng-Keopi) Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cold water
  • 1 tbsp instant coffee granules (plain standard one)
  • 2 tbsp powdered milk
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • Ice-cubes

How to make:

  • Using a cocktail shaker or a lidded plastic tall glass, I am sure you have a container tucked away inside your cupboard 😊, tip in the coffee granules, powdered milk and honey together into this container.
  • Add the cold water.
  • Securely fasten the lid to your container and give it a good shake.  It is a good cardio exercise so give it your all.
  • If your fridge/freezer has not got the built-in ice-crusher, just take a clean tea towel.  Put the ice-cubes in the middle.  Gather the edges of the tea towel around the ice cubes, and then smack that bundle a few times against some solid surface 😜 such as against your worktop.  Don’t break anything.  You are only making coffee, there is no need to cause a complete redecoration of your kitchen.🤣 .  Instead of bashing the ice-cubes against a work-surface, you could also use a meat tenderizer to break hem.
  • Get a tall glass and pour in the coffee mix and then add the crushed ice.
  • Give it a good mix with your ready straw and drink.

Enjoy

Ripen Fruits with a Banana

Ripening tomatoes with banana, photo by PH Morton

Food Tips

Ripen Fruits with a Banana

 

Now that summer has rolled into autumn, it is now time to gather in the fruits and vegetables still in the garden before the onset of cold weather and frost.

 

 

From his experience of keeping an allotment for more than 50 years, Mick, our neighbour, and good friend has lots of tips for gardening and how to store the yield produce.

He said to ripen green tomatoes, store them with a banana in a closed container. We use spare space in a kitchen drawer.

Peter applied this tip with a few green tomatoes last night and when he checked them this morning and found that they had started to ripen. (See above photo)

Remember!

Do not refrigerate an unripe banana.  The temperature of the fridge will halt the natural ripening process of a banana and would now remain green and unripe even when taken out of the fridge.

Aromatic Crispy Duck

Peking Duck Parcel, photo by JMorton

Aromatic Crispy Duck

Crispy aromatic duck is a very popular Chinese meal starter.

It is a  treat!

The aroma promises a savoury delight to come as the chef or server starts shredding the crispy duck using a couple of forks at your table.

A bit shredded meat at a time would be wrapped in a pancake with cucumber and spring onion sticks generously drizzled with hoisin sauce.

This divine little parcel is good to go.

yum!

A good friend once said that instead of using spring onions, a good substitute would be a leek, with its onion taste as well as easier to cut.

 

 

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

Fennel Bulb, photo by PH Morton

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

Fennel is related to the carrot family and indigenous to the Mediterranean but they are now grown in many parts of the world.

It is a perennial herb with yellow flowers. It is very aromatic.

Fennel is very versatile.  The bulbs, see above, foliage (leaves) and seeds are widely used in culinary around the world.

The bulb is delicious drizzled in olive oil and balsamic vinegar and then baked in the oven.  It is sweet tasting, perfect starter or as a side dish with roast meat or even baked fish dishes.

Click here for the baked fennel bulb.

Postulant Cook’s Guide to Choosing Cheeses

 

Cheese for afters, photo by JMorton

Postulant Cook

Postulant Cook’s Guide to Choosing Cheeses

Now that Christmas is almost upon us, we have to start thinking what cheese or cheeses will grace our dining table.

Of course cheese is popular all year round but there is something special about nibbling on a selection of cheeses, wash down with a glass or few of red wine during the Christmas holidays.  (Please note though that we do not promote drinking and driving!!!)

Below is my favourite cheeses, which I hope will help in making your own selection.

Blue Cheese

Brie

Cheddar Cheese

Goat Cheese

Emmental

Feta

Wensleydale

Ah, Wensleydale! The Mozart of cheeses.
-T.S. Eliot