Category: GLOBAL LIBRARY

The small print
Copyright Notice – No infringement of any text or graphic copyright is intended. If you own the copyright to any original image or document used for the creation of the graphics or information on this site, please contact the Webmaster with all pertinent info so that proper credit can be given. If you wish to have it removed from the site, we will comply as soon as we can.

Thank you

The GlobalGranary.Org Team

24th December

Christmas Month

24th December

IMG_0536

When we were children we were grateful to those who filled our stockings at Christmas time. Why are we not grateful to God for filling our stockings with legs?

– G.K. Chesterton

❤❤❤

Christmas Stockings

Christmas stockings are essential to Christmas decorating.  The stockings work like magnets for Santa Claus.  If you had been good all year round then your Christmas stockings will be filled with lovely goodies, come Christmas morning.

I think Santa and his reindeers will appreciate really snazzy designed Christmas stockings.  They see billions of these that yours must stand out and perhaps will get the choicest gifts.

I had a very sad story regarding Christmas stocking when I was seven.  I have to admit I was rather a bit of a handful as a child.  When there was a strife amongst my siblings, my parents knew that I started it all. LOL

Anyway, despite my being so naughty, I still hoped that Father Christmas, the dear old Santa Claus, would overlook my willfulness and would still leave me a present.  So with so much excitement like a seven-year old of the 70s, I hang one of my favourite red socks in our veranda.  It was a knee-high sock so I thought it could sufficiently hold a few nice pesos and chocolates.

It was my little secret.  I did not tell my mother and father or anyone because I had hoped to surprise them in the morning with my present from Santa; that even a naughty girl like me deserves a gift!!!

The next morning on Christmas day, I went to check and it was all empty.  (I was so very, very upset, so upset in fact that it still gives me nightmare now and seriously messed me mentally.)  😉

With the maturity of a seven-year-old, I told myself that I was so naughty I did not deserve a present from Santa.  Justice learned from an early age.

December 18th Christmas Day Getting Near

Our front garden Christmas lights this year, a skiing Santa

Our good friend and neighbour Mick gave us this novel 3ft (91 cm) high skiing Santa garden Christmas light. His daughter did not need it any more as she was moving from a house to a flat (apartment). We put Santa by our front door in the front garden area for passersby to see as he skies towards Christmas day.

The Yew Tree

Our beautiful  Yew Tree lit up at night with Christmas lights, photo by PH Morton

The Yew Tree

We have got a lovely yew tree in our front garden which we dress up with lights on Christmas. It is now about 8 feet tall and still growing.

But did you know that the yew tree has a not quite a nice superstition attached to it?!!!

Yew (Taxus baccata) is a characteristic tree of churchyards, where some are estimated to be well over 1,000 years old.:
It is believed that ever since people arrived upon UK  shores, they planted yew trees in acts of sanctification, close to where they eventually hoped to be laid to rest.
And, according to a label on a yew tree at Kew Gardens in 1993:

The Druids regarded yew as sacred and planted it close to their temples. As early Christians often built their churches on these consecrated sites, the association of yew trees with churchyards was perpetuated

Apparently, if you bring in a yew (as part of a bundle of greenery for decoration) inside the house at Christmas, there will be a death in the family before the year out. It is also advised not to take yew inside the house because it is very unlucky!!!

Oh no, our yew tree is so beautiful to be a source of such malevolent superstition.

And all parts of the yew tree are poisonous, the hidden seeds inside the berries are extremely poisonous.

Global Christmas Lights – The Filipino Paról.

As I mentioned in my earlier blog (O (Old) Christmas Tree) about Christmas decorations and how we get them from storage in our loft/attics etc at the beginning of each Christmas season. We check the plugs and fuses of our old Christmas lights and see how many bulbs still work. I think the oldest lights I have are over 40 years old and we drape them around our 45-year-old Christmas tree I had when growing up.

Last Christmas when we were in the Philippines visiting our family, we saw amazing Christmas decorations and lights almost everywhere. We bought back from halfway around the globe, one particular Christmas decoration which is popular in the Philippines. It is called a  paról.

A paról is a star-shaped or star patterned lantern, the shape representing the Star of Bethlehem that guided The Three Kings to the birthplace and manger of Jesus. A paról can come in various sizes and designs/patterns as long as it is a five-pointed star shape and can be illuminated.  They are traditionally made out bamboo and paper. Nowadays they can be constructed from materials such as plastic, glass, thick strong polythene & light metal strips  They are illuminated by candles or electric light bulbs. paróls are traditional to Filipinos at Christmas as the Christmas tree is to us.  Modern electric/battery powered paróls can produce colourful complex patterns like some of our home Christmas lights.

 

Global Christmas Lights – The Filipino Paról.

Parol, photo by PH Morton +

Parol by PH Morton

 Paról Light in our NW London house!

 

%d bloggers like this: