Category: Global Philosophers

Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (Gastronome)

Philosopher/Gastronome

Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (Gastronome)

Jean-Anthelme_Brillat_de_Savarin_(1755-1826)

Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

BioData

 

  • First Name: Jean Anthelme
  • Surname: Brillat-Savarin
  • DoB: 01 April 1755
  • PoB: Belley, Ain
  • DoD: 2 February 1826
  • Education: Law, Chemistry, Medicine in Dijon
  • Occupation: Elected mayor in Belley, Language teacher (French) Music Teacher (Violin), Magistrate, Judge, Writer

 

 

Brillat Savarin wrote what  arguably the most famous book on food, The Physiology of Taste.  It was an intelligent book which has not been out of print to these days.  The book is a celebration of food, very descriptive, lots of opinions, anecdotal, historical, philosophical, factual, fanciful, poetical and some recipes included.

Honore Balzac was a fan of the book.

Poultry is for the cook what canvas is for the painter.
– Savarin

Tell me what you eat, I’ll tell you who you are.
– Savarin

Publilius Syrus Quotes

Publilius_SyrusPublilius Syrus (46 BC – 29 BC), was a Latin writer of sententiae. He was a Syrian who was brought as a slave to Italy, but by his wit and talent he won the favour of his master, who freed and educated him. Publilius’ name, due to early medieval palatalization of ‘l’ between two ‘i’s, is often presented by manuscripts (and some printed editions) in corrupt form as ‘Publius’.

– Wikipedia

Pulilius Syrus Quotes

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As men, we are all equal in the presence of death.
~~~
An agreeable companion on a journey is as good as a carriage.
~~~
  A good reputation is more valuable than money.
~~~
 An agreeable companion on a journey is as good as a carriage.
~~~
Every one excels in something in which another fails.
~~~ 
  Fortune is like glass,—the brighter the glitter, the more easily broken.
~~~
He sleeps well who knows not that he sleeps ill.
~~~
 It is well to moor your bark with two anchors.
~~~
It is sometimes expedient to forget who we are.
~~~
  Learn to see in another’s calamity the ills which you should avoid.
~~~
Many receive advice, few profit by it.
~~~
 No tears are shed when an enemy dies.
~~~
Patience is a remedy for every sorrow.
~~~  
Powerful indeed is the empire of habit.
~~~
The anger of lovers renews the strength of love.

To do two things at once is to do neither.

The loss which is unknown is no loss at all
~~~
There are some remedies worse than the disease.
~~~
While we stop to think, we often miss our opportunity.
~~~
Whatever you can lose, you should reckon of no account.
~~~
What is left when honour is lost?
~~~
When Fortune is on our side, popular favour bears her company.
~~~
You should hammer your iron when it is glowing hot

Johann Kaspar (or Caspar) Lavater

Swiss Poet & Physiognomist

Johann Kaspar (or Caspar) Lavater

Lavater by - August Friedrich Oelenhainz (June 28, 1745 – November 5, 1804) was a German painter

Lavater by – August Friedrich Oelenhainz (June 28, 1745 – November 5, 1804) was a German painter

BioData

  • Full Name: Johann Kaspar Lavater
  • DoB: 15 November 1741
  • PoB: Zurich
  • Death: 2 January 1801 (59)
  • Nationality: Swiss
  • Education: Educated at Gymnasium
  • Occupation: poet and physiognomist, Protestant pastor,
  • Legacy:  Founder of physiognomics

Mr Lavater had a very interesting occupation.  He was apparently a physiognomist which means he had the ability to tell your character just by looking at your outward appearance, especially at your face.

Interesting!

 

As Quoted by Lavater:

All affectation is the vain and ridiculous attempt of poverty to appear rich.
—Lavater

He who comes from the kitchen smells of its smoke; he who adheres to a sect has something of its cant; the college air pursues the student, and dry inhumanity him who herds with literary pedants.
— Lavater

Where there is much pretension, much has been borrowed; nature never pretends.
— Lavater

Meng Zi aka Mencius

 

Meng Zi

Meng Zi

Mencius (aka Mengzi or Meng-Tze) was a 4th Century BCE Chinese philosopher, who is the most famous Confucian second only to Confucius himself.

The difference between Meng Zi and Confucius was their style of writing.

Confucius was a no nonsense guy, he believe in brevity.  He said things as short and succint.

Meng Zi on the otherhand has a free flowing thought that bled through his pen.  He liked to explain things in the minutest of details.


Let’s hear it from Mencius:

If you are listened to, be content. If you are not listened to, be more content.
– Meng Zi

Stephen Fry Untwined!

Stephen Fry Art bu VIKTOR MILLER-GAUSA

Stephen Fry
Art bu VIKTOR MILLER-GAUSA

Once upon a time Stephen Fry seems to be a twin of the equally popular and erudite Hugh Laurie. I miss both of them doing comedy on television. To these days, I am still partial to Jeeves and Wooster and of course Blackadder.

Stephen Fry is now a very popular and reliable British Awards presenter for his keen intelligence and dry humour ready wit.

……………………………………………………………………………………
Stephen Fry as Quoted:

Architecture offers quite extraordinary opportunities to serve the community, to enhance the landscape, refresh the environment and to advance mankind – the successful architect needs training to overcome these pitfalls however, and start earning some serious money.
———–

At my age travel broadens the behind.
– Stephen Fry

…….

I don’t need you to remind me of my age. I have a bladder to do that for me.
– Stephen Fry

stephen_fry

“Stop feeling sorry for yourself and you will be happy.”
Stephen_Fry_signature.svg

William Hazlitt

A man who does not endeavour to seem more than he is will generally be thought nothing of. We habitually make such large deductions for pretence and imposture that no real merit will stand against them. It is necessary to set off our good qualities with a certain air of plausibility and self-importance, as some attention to fashion is necessary.
– Hazlitt.

—–

A lively blockhead in company is a public benefit. Silence or dullness by the side of folly looks like wisdom.
– Hazlitt.

—–
Every man, in his own opinion, forms an exception to the ordinary rules of morality.
– William Hazlitt
—–
Envy is a littleness of soul, which cannot see beyond a certain point, and if it does not occupy the whole space feels itself excluded.
~William Hazlitt
….
Just as much as we see in others we have in ourselves.
~William Hazlitt
….

Learning is its own exceeding great reward.
– William Hazlitt

LET a man’s talents or virtues be what they may, we feel satisfaction in his society only as he is satisfied in himself. We cannot enjoy the good qualities of a friend if he seems to be none the better for them.
Hazlitt.
….
Man is make-believe animal – he is never so truly himself as when he is acting a part.
– William Hazlitt
….
MAN is an intellectual animal, therefore an everlasting contradiction to himself. His senses centre in himself, his ideas reach to the ends of the universe; so that he is torn in pieces between the two without the possibility of its ever being otherwise. A mere physical being or a pure spirit can alone be satisfied with itself.
– Hazlitt.

——–
No truly great man ever thought himself so.
– Hazlitt

OF all virtues, magnanimity is the rarest. There are a hundred persons of merit for one who willingly acknowledges it in another.
W. Hazlitt

SIMPLICITY of character is the natural result of profound thought.
– Hazlitt.
——-
SOCIETY is a more level surface than we imagine. Wise men or absolute fools are hard to be met with, as there are few giants or dwarfs. The heaviest charge we can bring against the general texture of society is that it is commonplace. Our fancied superiority to others is in some one thing which we think most of because we excel in it, or have paid most attention to it; whilst we overlook their superiority to us in something else which they set equal and exclusive store by.
– Hazlitt.

—–

VULGAR prejudices are those which arise out of accident, ignorance, or authority; natural prejudices are those which arise out of the constitution of the human mind itself.
– Hazlitt.
——
We often repent the good we have done as well as the ill.
-William Hazlitt
…….
WE are never so much disposed to quarrel with others as when we are dissatisfied with ourselves.
Hazlitt.
….
We are not hypocrites in our sleep.
– William Hazlitt

WE are never so much disposed to quarrel with others as when we are dissatisfied with ourselves.
– Hazlitt.

WOMEN never reason and therefore they are, comparatively, seldom wrong. They judge instinctively of what falls under their immediate observation or experience, and do not trouble themselves about remote or doubtful consequences. If they make no profound discoveries, they do not involve themselves in gross absurdities. It is only by the help of reason and logical inference, according to Hobbes, that “man becomes excellently wise or excellently foolish.”
– Hazlitt.