Category: LIFESTYLE

The small print
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Autumn is here!

Autumn leaf, photo by PH Morton

Autumn is here!

Yesterday was the last day of the summer. We have had a glorious one this year.

And today, it is the first day of autumn, which is heralded by a great pouring of cold rain, almost all day long.

As autumn progresses there will be a lot of falling leaves from various shades of orange, brown and red.

UK parks, gardens, roads, and open spaces will be garland with these beautiful leaves that would be gloriously aesthetic at first but would soon enough turn into a slippery sorry mess.

Autumn though has a charm of its own.  It is harvest time.  Time to bring in the harvest from the garden.

 

Friday

Friday

Friday Tidbits:

The great Charles Dickens was born on a Friday and consider Friday as his lucky day.

Many sailors of today’s modern world of navigation and satellite still refuse to start sail on Fridays.

There was this urban legend regarding sailing of Friday:

Sometime in the 19th century, the Royal Navy attempted to finally dispel the old superstition among sailors that beginning a voyage on a Friday was certain to bring bad luck. To demonstrate the falseness of this belief, they decided to commission a ship named HMS Friday. Her keel was laid on a Friday, she was launched on a Friday, and she set sail on her maiden voyage on Friday the 13th, under the command of a Captain James Friday. She was never seen or heard from again.

They said that there was never a ship called HMS Friday nor a Captain James Friday in the Royal Navy.  What if they did exist and the story did happen?  What if it was not an urban legend at all?!!! It would not be in the Royal Navy’s best interest to admit it, would it?!!!  I can smell a 19th-century conspiracy.  LMAO!!!

According to an article by Paul Clarke at eFinancialCareers, the best day to apply for a job is on a Friday when there is less competition, as many job seekers would have slunk off ready for the weekends.  Get your CV in first thing on a Friday.

 

St Catherine of Alexandria

Bernardino Luini - Saint Catherine

NT; (c) Stourhead; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

 

St Catherine of Alexandria

Feast Day:

  • 25 November 
  • 24 November with the Orthodox Churches of Russian origin

Apparently Catherine was a Alexandrian princess who was both beautiful and intelligent.  She was a noted scholar.

She turned to Christianity at the age of 14.  But by 18 she was martyred.

Legend has it that St Catherine paid heavily for her belief in Christianity.  Many forms of tortures and humiliations were use on the virgin Catherine to make her recant her faith in Jesus.

She was imprisoned.

She was scrubbed, using abrasive materials, until her whole body was sore and bleeding.

She was starved.

And finally she put her on a breaking wheel.

An angel came from heaven above and destroyed the wheel.

However  St Catherine’s tormentors were not defeated.  They used a sword to  behead her; instead of blood, milk spurted from her body.

 

Palm Sunday 2018

Just after Palm Sunday Service, iPhone photo by JMorton

Palm Sunday 2018

Today is Palm Sunday, the start of the Holy Week, where the crisis of the cross is imminent.

Let us take this Holy Week as a time to ruminate the lives we lead.

To start with, here is a wonderful food for thought:

Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that.  Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.

~ Martin Luther King Jr

Nowruz Mubarak

Nowruz Mubarak

Pomegranate, Photo by JMorton

Peter and I were out and about today;  we took an uber to go for Peter’s physio at the Royal Free Hospital.

Our Uber driver was really chatty.  After talking about the weather, we told him that it would be the first day of spring tomorrow, 20 March.

He mentioned that it would be an important day for him tomorrow.  In fact he will be taking a few days off beginning tomorrow.

He said it is Persian New Year.

He further elaborated that the first day of the New Year is spent visiting friends and relatives who are older than the visitors.  Parents, older brother, older sister, uncles, aunties, etc.

On the second day, it would be the turn of the younger ones, especially the children, who gets presents, usually money.  So it would be normal to see Iranians handing out fiver or tenner to children during the next few days.

I asked him how to wish someone a Persian New Year.  He said carefully, Nowruz Mubarak.  I repeated it and he was very impressed.  🙂

So wishing you all a Nowruz Mubarak.

He said that a lot of pomegranates will be on offer as well as recipes with saffron.  There will be a lot of sweet things like cakes and biscuits.

He mentioned a funny thing, he said that they even have a version of Santa Clause during the New Year celebration. Interesting!

The family get-together will happen during the weekend for grand eating out or dining in.

He said that in Iran that new year festivities usually last for a good couple of weeks.

Happy Persian New Year to you all!

 

Ash Wednesday

Ash Wednesday

Following Shrove Tuesday yesterday, today is Ash Wednesday, the official first day of Lent during the Christian year and the prelude to Easter.  Lent represents the 40 days that Jesus Christ spent in the wilderness, fasting and contemplating his mission on earth. Known as the ‘Day of Ashes’ because of the practice of having ash rubbed &  drawn on the forehead in the shape of a cross (representing Christ’s crucifixion), by a priest at the  dedicated Ash Wednesday church service. The priest and participants from the church congregation intone the phrase either the words:-

“Repent, and believe in the Gospel” or  the dictum “Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.”       

Anglican,Catholic and most Protestant and Christians hold Ash Wednesday services around the world. Following the service, participants observe some sort of fasting,abstinence and spiritual contemplation for 40 Days, ending on Maundy Thursday in 2018.

The practice of using  ash comes from the 11th Century and is taken from the Biblical Book of Daniel, where ashes are regarded as a sign of Penance & fasting. The ashes are normally made by the burning of palm crosses. These palm crosses were  handed out to  church congregations during the previous year’s Palm Sunday service (commemorating Christ’s entry into Jerusalem to crowds waving palm leaves in celebration) and given back to the priest shortly before Ash Wednesday. The priest will then burn the crosses and mix the ash normally with Holy Oil to sanctify and make a ‘paste’ with which to rub on the participant’s forehead.

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