Tag: Europe

Roaming Charges on Death Throes in Europe?!!!

mobileThis is good news. We are now mobile/cell phones using nations and the end of roaming charges can only be good news to us all. We have heard of much horror stories, which landed so many unsuspecting users with thousands of pounds of hidden and not quite so hidden roaming charges.

The only thing is that, what does it mean the roaming charges are to end by Christmas 2015? Does this mean roaming charges are not quite dead yet?!!!

So we must not celebrate by using our phone’s roaming apps just yet. 😉 Wait a while longer! Easy does it!

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Brussels, 3 April 2014

European Parliament votes to end roaming charges, expand consumer rights and make it easier to create better telecoms.

Today the European Parliament voted to end roaming charges by Christmas 2015, as part of a wider vote in support to the Commission’s proposed regulation for a “Connected Continent” (telecoms single market)*.

European Commission Vice President Neelie Kroes said:

“This vote is the EU delivering for citizens. This is what the EU is all about – getting rid of barriers to make life easier and less expensive.”

“Nearly all of us depend on mobile and internet connections as part of our daily lives. We should know what we are buying, we should not be ripped-off, and we should have the opportunity to change our mind. Companies should have the chance to serve all of us, and this regulation makes it easier for them to do that. It’s win-win.”

“In 2010 I promised to end roaming charges by the end of 2015, and now we are one step away from achieving that result.”

“Beyond the highly visible barrier of roaming we are now close to removing many other barriers so Europeans can enjoy open, seamless communications wherever they are”.

EU Member States will now continue to review the regulation and the Commission expects final agreement of the Regulation by end of 2014.

*The “Connected Continent” telecoms Regulation was proposed by the Commission in September 2013. It aims to bring us much closer to a truly single market for telecoms in the EU, by ending roaming charges, guaranteeing an open internet for all by banning blocking and degrading of content, coordinating spectrum licensing for wireless broadband, giving internet and broadband customers more transparency in their contracts, and making it easier for customers to switch providers.

Background
Tweets from @NeelieKroesEU today included:

“Today EU Parliament voted to end roaming charges by Christmas 2015 !! #roaming”

“We need a digital Europe – today we are another step closer with EU Parl vote for #ConnectedContinent”

“Find out more about the EU plan that is set to end #roaming + guarantee #NetNeutrality on Connected Continent webiste”

Contacts
Email: comm-kroes@ec.europa.eu Tel: +32.229.57361 Twitter: @RyanHeathEU

Stacey Dooley

StaceyStacey Dooley’s investigations on drug trafficking was extremely informative and interesting.

Peter and I watched the series utterly fascinated on what goes on in the world of drug trafficking.  Ordinary people of South America were involved in the trade to make a living, otherwise they’ll die of starvation.  It is a catch 22 situation.

Stacey was an intrepid girl and was able to charm information from unlikely sources.

 

Oak Carving- Europe’s Oldest?!!!

What a tremendous find. Really exciting. Wood carvings during the Mesolithic and Neolithic period is virtually unheard of. And yet here we are, faced with an ancient but rather sophisticated wood carving. We may have to revisit our perceived history. Probably stone age is not so stoned afterall!!!;)

JPJhermes …………………………………..

6,000-year-old oak carving is among Europe’s oldest

July 29, 2013 By Filed Under: News
Maerdy Oak - Colour overhead - white background - JPEG - Low resolutionOverhead IllustrationA 6,000-year-old oak timber carved with a concentric oval pattern and zig-zag lines, recently discovered in the RhonddaValley, Mid Wales, is thought to be among the oldest decorative wood carvings known from Europe. Found by Heritage Recording Services Wales during the construction of a wind farm near Maerdy, the 1.7m long timber had been preserved in a waterlogged peat deposit, together with 11 other unmarked pieces of wood. With one end apparently deliberately rounded and the other tapering slightly, the timber has been interpreted as a post, possibly marking a locally significant site or a tribal boundary, or representing a votive offering. Radiocarbon dating has placed it in c.4270-4000 BC, in the late Mesolithic or early Neolithic period. ‘Most finds from this period consist of stone tools, so to have a decorative carving, on wood no less, is very exciting,’ said lead archaeologist Richard Scott Jones. ‘We all put bets on its age, and people suggested Dark Age, Iron Age – but no one imagined it would come back as Mesolithic. We have since shown it to a number of Neolithic and Mesolithic experts, and they say it is a unique discovery.’ Sub-Station Area - Colour LOW RESHe added: ‘This period marks the transition between mobile hunter-gatherer groups and sedentary settlements. The timber was found by a stream edge on a small flat plateau, and if it is a post, it was probably marking something; maybe a sacred site, or a pool, or a nearby hunting ground – there is an ancient lakebed, which could have attracted animals, just a stone’s throw away – or some kind of boundary.’ Similar abstract patterns are known from Neolithic pottery, and from standing stones such as those at the Gavrinis passage grave in Brittany, or, closer to home, at Barclodiad y Gawres, Anglesey, Richard said. Due to the rarity of such decorations surviving on ancient timbers, however, the team sent the oak timber to experts from the University of Wales Trinity St David, and Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust, to confirm that the markings were manmade. ‘We wondered if the lines could have been created by the larvae of oak bark beetles, but after consultation with palaeoentomologists, we are happy that these are not burrowing channels,’ said Richard. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHe added: ‘As the timber is about 100 years older than the deposit in which it was found, this may suggest that the oak timber had been brought to the spot deliberately, and perhaps carved on site. If so, then that is a lot of energy to expend, which may indicate that the markings have a special purpose, rather than casual whittling.’ The oak timber is currently undergoing conservation with York Archaeological Trust, where it is expected to remain until 2014. All images: Richard Scott Jones
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