Category: Did you know?

Ripen Fruits with a Banana

Ripening tomatoes with banana, photo by PH Morton

Food Tips

Ripen Fruits with a Banana

 

Now that summer has rolled into autumn, it is now time to gather in the fruits and vegetables still in the garden before the onset of cold weather and frost.

 

 

From his experience of keeping an allotment for more than 50 years, Mick, our neighbour, and good friend has lots of tips for gardening and how to store the yield produce.

He said to ripen green tomatoes, store them with a banana in a closed container. We use spare space in a kitchen drawer.

Peter applied this tip with a few green tomatoes last night and when he checked them this morning and found that they had started to ripen. (See above photo)

Remember!

Do not refrigerate an unripe banana.  The temperature of the fridge will halt the natural ripening process of a banana and would now remain green and unripe even when taken out of the fridge.

What is a Harvest Moon?

Harvest Moon, Photo by PH Morton

What is a Harvest Moon?

Harvest moon is a full moon.

It heralds the coming of autumn when farmers are believed to take in their harvests from the field before the frost gets to them.

What makes a harvest moon more special than being just a full moon is that it appears larger and orange and it occurs in September during the autumnal equinox in the Northern Hemisphere.

That is the autumnal equinox?

It is that time when the earth’s equator is directly in line with the center of the sun.

As the Northern hemisphere has its autumn equinox, the Southern Hemisphere is starting its Spring equinox.

 

25 September 2018 – Harvest Moon

Shrove Tuesday

shrove-tuesday1Today is shrove Tuesday, which has now become better known as Pancake Day.

What is Shrove Tuesday about?  Has it become just a day of cooking and tossing pancakes?

Shrove Tuesday is the last day of merriment and feasting before Lent begins in earnest.

But in truth and in its history, today is about penitence.  Shrove Tuesday got its name from the ritual of shriving, which early Christians used to do.

The act of shriving meant that Christians would confess their sins and their shortcomings and in so doing will receive absolutions.

Absolution means the person will be forgiven of his sins and released from his guilt and pain that he had caused.

This tradition is very old.

Shrove Tuesday

It was a custom and tradition of the early Christians to confess their sins a week before the start of Lent to their priest/confessor, who shall so shrive them.

Today is not only about pancake but a time to think about the wrong deeds that we have done or have continued  doing.  We must be penitent of them.

On the happier side, Shrove Tuesday is also about partying and feasting.  Time to cook and serve all the foods that may have to be given up for the sober Lent to come. Barbecue the meat and fish and make pastas so no food are wasted for the coming Lent.  Today is like a Mardi Gras – Fat Tuesday.

Pancake became the ideal food for Tuesday because it uses up all the fats, milk and eggs with the addition of flour.

Source:  BBC.co.uk

 

 

 

Passion Fruit

Passion fruit, photo by PH Morton

Passion Fruit

Photo by PH Morton

Passion fruit is sweet with a tinge of sourness.  It is very seedy.  The seeds are soft and edible.

The scientific name for passion fruit is Passiflora edulis. It comes from a vine rather than a tree.

It is native to South America.

Did you know?

To tell whether the fruit is ripe is to look at the skin.  When the outer skin has shriveled then it is ripe.  The shriveled the skin the riper it is.

 

 

Happy Halloween

Happy Halloween

Tis the night — the night
Of the grave’s delight,
And the warlocks are at their play;
Ye think that without
The wild winds shout,
But no, it is they — it is they.

~Arthur Cleveland Coxe

Happy Halloween to our visitors.

Here  in London we enjoy Halloween. On 31 October, millions around the world celebrate a festival that has evolved from nature rituals of ancient times.
Halloween, or it’s proper name Hallowe’en (Hallows evening)contracted from the Christian ‘All Hallows Evening’ or ‘Eve’,  is thought to have pagan roots and from a festival name of ‘Samhain’.
Halloween is supposed to be the time when the earthly and spirit worlds meet allowing spirits of those departed and fairies to dwell for one night on earth and commune with us mere mortals. It is an important date for pagans, witches etc. The festival predates Christianity by thousands of years.

Wiccans  hold one of their seasonal Sabbats (festivals) every 31 October. Witchcraft & witches are derived from the old English words,  wiccecræft & wicce.

To try and suppress such pagan non-Christian beliefs, the Church hierarchy then later added All Saints Day (to commemorate all Christian Saints) on the 1st November, followed by All Souls Day on 2nd November, when the deceased family, relatives, friends etc., are remembered and commemorated with Church services.

Halloween is thought to mainly originate from ancient Celtic festivals in Scotland, Ireland, Wales and northern Europe. These Celtic festivals and rituals marked the end of summer and the coming of winter after autumn and the unwelcome arrival of longer darker & colder nights. Bonfires were lit to keep the dark at bay and rituals performed to banish ghosts, evil spirits, fairies from coming with the winter darkness. Candle lit turnip lanterns carved with scary faces were made which later evolved into the pumpkin lanterns we see now.

Halloween spread to North America in the 1800s with the arrival of Irish & Celtic immigrants. It quickly became a big festival which, evolved over the years into what takes place today. Children dressing up as ghosts, witches etc., touring around the neighbourhood with patient parents on Halloween, trick or treating. Halloween themed parties are de riguer .
Before pumpkins became the favourite of Halloween lantern makers (they are easier to carve), turnips and swedes were and still are used. Some of these carved pumpkins are minor works of art.
The Irish settlers arriving in America found no turnips so used the native grown pumpkins as lanterns as are used to this day.

When I was a child on Halloween, my mother and I would carve two lanterns out of smaller root vegetable swedes (Swedish turnip), as pumpkins were rare here then. The swedes are harder to carve, but worth the effort to an imaginative young mind. We would put a lantern in our living or bedroom window
We would keep the lantern swedes until Guy Fawkes Night on each 5th November. We would re use them if they were still fresh as lanterns then burn them on the bonfire we had in our garden as we set off fireworks, so much fun and happy memories ?

This early evening, like the last few Halloweens’, we will take our grandsons around the local roads. We meet other families too and exchange laughs. A lot of neighbours get into the spirit (pardon the pun!) and have pumpkin lanterns like us by their front garden gates. Some open their doors dressed up in scary costumes, a good fun evening.

 

Christmas’ Forgotten List

Christmas Decor
Photo by JMorton

The item that would really worry me that I forgot to buy for Christmas is the battery. I remember one Christmas when I bought all these beautiful remote controlled toys for my son.

On Christmas morning, he can’t play with them because of the missing batteries. I saw how bravely he was trying to hide his disappointment but it did break my heart.

Now I always ensure that we have batteries for Christmas.

The next item is the tin foil, the aluminium wrap, to cover the turkey. Stress….

Then running out of gravy granules, that is total disaster. I like my roast swimming in gravy.

Christmas’ Forgotten List

Below is the top 10 forgotten items.  Hope this will be a reminder to make Christmas painless and extra special.

Top 10 forgotten Christmas items:

1.    Batteries
2.    Sellotape
3.    Crackers
4.    Gift tags
5.    Cranberry sauce
6.    Wrapping paper
7.    Pigs in blankets
8.    Napkins
9.    Beer
10.  Gravy

Please let us know your forgotten item or items and we will add it to our list.

You Are What You Eat

The proof is in the eating of the cupcake, lol, Photo by PH Morton

You Are What You Eat

It is true I am afraid, well in my case anyway.  I love chocolates and it shows: in the tummy area, along the hips, in the face and everywhere. 🙂

Belonging to the class mammalia (species with the mammary glands, lol) we are rather versatile in what we include in what we eat.

There are at least four classifications of diets or intake of nourishment.  Which do you belong?

  • Herbivores, these are those who eat greens, the verdant leaves and sprouts of plants.  Are you as vegetarian as the brontosaurus?  Or cows and horses perhaps?
  • Carnivores, these are those who like to eat meat.  I must admit, I have to have meat in my diet.  I am very partial to pork and chicken.  Now and again, you here news of people who are practising cannibals, meaning they eat people. There are even news that during the Russian famine of the 1920s, food was extremely scarce the peasant started eating human limbs, which were up for sale.  Anything for survival.
  • Omnivores, these are those who eat greens and meat (also chocolates), which are us humans.  We do like a variety in our diet.  Apparently some bears are also known to be omnivores.  We don’t just like to eat grass like cows and carabaos on pasture.  We want a bit of both in our meals.  Roast meat with three vegs.  🙂
  • Insectivores, these are those who eat insects.  Some humans have a penchant for eating insects like locust, crickets, grasshoppers and juicy spiders.  Humans are now giving aardvarks a run for their money.

 

 

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